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Arts Features

This week rock star Eddie Money launched the world premiere of his own musical in Rochester. It’s called “Two Tickets to Paradise: The Eddie Money Musical,” which features the famed “Money Man” himself. The star whose recording career spanned from the late ‘60s through the ‘80s recently stopped by the Need to Know studio. He explained why it was important to share his story - the good, the bad and the near-death – through the medium of a musical for all to see.

With gleaming ivory keyboards and a polished cherry wood finish, the beloved Massey Memorial Organ has been a trademark of the Chautauqua Institution experience for generations. But during a recent routine inspection, staff discovered water damage to the historic organ.

At first glance they appear to be intimate, one-of-a-kind watercolor portraits. But when you read between the lines you see life stories of bravery, pain, hope, and resilience. Charmaine Wheatley is an artist-in-residence at the University of Rochester. For the past year she has focused a portion of her work on reducing stigma of those who live with mental illness. Her process was the subject of a short documentary titled: “Portraits of Life” by Epic 10 Films in association with the UR School of Medicine & Dentistry.

On this edition of Need to Know we learn how a project capturing candid conversations with watercolor help to reduce stigma and empower those living with mental illness.

American mezzo-soprano and Eastman professor of voice Katherine Ciesinski is among the 2018 Grammy winning artists named over the weekend.  She sang a leading role in the Houston Symphony's live recording of Alban Berg's Wozzeck, which won in the Best Opera Recording category.

We’re following the adventures of composer Glenn McClure, who journeyed to Antarctica in late 2016. During an epic journey funded by the National Science Foundation, the SUNY Geneseo and Eastman professor lived in a tent on an ice shelf and worked with scientists to collect data. He is now using that data as inspiration for new music.

Take a listen:

The composer writes:

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An iconic figure in the art world, both in Rochester and around the world has died.

Wendell Castle died in his Scottsville home on Saturday. That word came Sunday morning from RIT, where Castle was an artist in residence. He was 85 years old.

Wendell Castle was an artist for more than 60 years and is considered a founder of the American Crafts and Art Furniture movements. More than 100  of his works are installed in museums worldwide, and up until recently, was still innovating in his studio in the Rochester area.

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A former Eastman School of Music piano student is speaking out about his lawsuit alleging he was retaliated against when he rebuffed the sexual advances of a professor.

Joseph Irrera, who grew up in Batavia, now lives in the San Francisco area. But the 35 year old classical pianist says it’s been tough getting a teaching position, something he thought he was on track to do after pursuing his doctoral degree at Eastman.

A team at the Rochester Institute of Technology has produced two first of their kind table-top games that aim to promote and enhance the public understanding of religion and law.

The two games, Lost and Found and Lost and Found: Order in the Court are set in 12th century Cairo, between 1170 and 1180.

Allen Warren/wikipedia

A Rochester-based entertainment journalist and artist manager remembers David Cassidy as a  talented vocalist who could never break out of his pop star persona.  The teen and pre-teen idol starred in the 1970s sitcom ``The Partridge Family'' and sold millions of records as the musical group's lead singer.

Bruce Pilato, who worked with Cassidy on a 1990 TV segment for People Magazine, said he confided in him that he was frustrated because he wasn't seen as a serious musician.

      

  The opera Mrs. President is being performed Saturday night in Rochester. It tells the story of the first woman to run for president, which happened earlier than you might think.

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