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State Democratic Party chair says outcome of probes could determine Cuomo's political future

The chair of the state’s Democratic Party, Jay Jacobs, says the outcome of several investigations into alleged bad behavior by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his top aides will help determine whether the party can back the governor for a fourth term in office. “We have to look at what the actual determination is by these various investigations,” Jacobs said to Dan Clark from New York NOW. “And there isn’t just one, there have been multiple investigations.” Cuomo is facing an ongoing probe by State...

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New York NOW

The chair of the state’s Democratic Party, Jay Jacobs, says the outcome of several investigations into alleged bad behavior by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his top aides will help determine whether the party can back the governor for a fourth term in office.

“We have to look at what the actual determination is by these various investigations,” Jacobs said to Dan Clark from New York NOW. “And there isn’t just one, there have been multiple investigations.”

Provided

The Community Health Fair is back on Saturday for its 10th year to provide underserved communities with the COVID-19 vaccine, along with health care information and screenings.

The Black Physicians Network and the Rochester Black Nurses Association partnered with the Rochester Jamaican Organization and the Rochester West Indian Festival Organization to host over 20 community organizations that will be providing the health resources. Organizers said this year's event has a focus on mental health.

Foodlink also will be distributing food.

The window of opportunity for victims of childhood sexual abuse to file a civil lawsuit against their alleged abuser ends Aug. 13.

Survivors say it’s not too late to file a claim, but some would like another legal window sometime in the near future to accommodate those who are not yet ready to come forward.

Aaron Winters

Rochester’s festivals are back, and with them comes a new batch of city dollars.

This week, Governor Andrew Cuomo said that employers need to bring workers back to the office by Labor Day. He said that remote work is not as creative or productive, and working from home harms other businesses -- lunch spots, coffee shops, etc.

But many workers have reported thriving during the pandemic with a remote schedule. How do they interpret the governor's comments? We find out with our guests:

  • Kristen Seversky, product manager who works remotely
  • Andrew Amato, remote worker
  • Andrew Brady, co-founder of the Rochester chapter for Conscious Capitalism and CEO of the XLR8 Team

What have local theaters learned from the pandemic? We talk with representatives from several local theaters about the challenges they've faced, the successes they've had, and how they think the industry may change in the future as a result of the pandemic. We also discuss what's on stage this season.

Our guests:

Vaccination rate in NY prisons at 46%; all inmates offered the vaccine

Jul 30, 2021
Solvejg Wastvedt / WSKG News file photo

All 32,000 people incarcerated in New York state prisons have been offered the COVID-19 vaccine and, to date, 46% have been vaccinated.

According to the state Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, there have been vaccine clinics at each of the state's more than 50 prisons.

In an emailed statement, DOCCS said 15,195 vaccines have been administered to date and additional vaccine clinics have been scheduled. The vaccination rate among incarcerated people, at 46%, is much lower than the statewide average of 62%.

Geva Theatre

First hour: How will the live theater industry change as a result of the pandemic?

Second hour: Discussing the future of remote work

Max Schulte/WXXI News

As the Delta variant leads to increasing numbers of COVID-19 cases and some governments are starting to require their employees to get vaccinated, private employers are taking a closer look at such policies.

But something is standing in their way.

"What's holding them back is if they implement a vaccine mandate, people will quit or people won't apply," said Beth Cordello, a labor and employment attorney with Pullano and Farrow.

James Brown / WXXI News

During remarks at the city’s violence prevention summit at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center on Thursday, Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren made her goal clear.

“We want to change violence in the city of Rochester permanently,” she said. “We don’t want this to be a one- or two-year thing. We want this to be a consistent reduction of violence in the city of Rochester until we no longer have violence in the city of Rochester.”

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Across the Universe with Jeff Spevak

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After 20 years of writing its own history, you’d think people could talk or write about Blackberry Smoke without referencing The Allman Brothers Band. Or Lynyrd Skynyrd. Or The Marshall Tucker Band.

Charlie Starr pays no mind to our need to place his band in such a box.

“Not really,” says Blackberry Smoke’s lead singer, guitarist, and songwriter. “Because I love those bands, so dearly.”

One man’s heaven is another man’s hell.

“It’s like, ‘Well, it could be worse, you know,’” Starr concedes. “They could say, ‘You guys remind me of the Bay City Rollers.’”

News from NPR

Zoom will pay $85 million to settle a lawsuit claiming it violated users' privacy rights, according to a preliminary settlement filed on Saturday. The class action suit by several Zoom users alleges the company shared personal data with Facebook, Google and LinkedIn, and allowed hackers to disrupt meetings with pornography, inappropriate language or other disturbing content in a practice called "Zoombombing."

Beginning in 1974, New Zealand police armed with dogs woke up Pacific Islanders who allegedly overstayed their visas at dawn, pushed them into police vans for questioning, then often deported them and placed their children in state care homes. The early morning operation became known as the "Dawn Raids."

Nearly 50 years later, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern on Sunday formally apologized for those raids and the lasting hurt they have caused. Ardern expressed the government's "sorrow, remorse and regret" over the raids.

A Belarusian sprinter who spoke out publicly about the "negligence" of her Olympic coaches says she was allegedly taken against her wishes to the Tokyo airport for a flight back to Belarus.

Krystsina Tsimanouskaya, 24, told Reuters in an interview Sunday that she was pleading for help from Japanese police at the airport and "will not return to Belarus."

Florida reported 21,683 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, the state's highest one-day total since the start of the pandemic, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More news from NPR

Arts & Life

Aaron Winters

Rochester’s festivals are back, and with them comes a new batch of city dollars.

provided photo

The National Women’s Hall of Fame has a new executive director.

The Seneca Falls-based museum has named Jennifer Gabriel to the newly created position.

Gabriel most recently headed up development and community relations for Hospicare & Palliative Care Services, based in Tompkins and Cortland counties.

Gabriel grew up in Ithaca, and she said that one of her goals is to get more people, both locally and nationally, to learn about the Finger Lakes connection to women’s rights as well as the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

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Officials have announced that the Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester recently saw the birth of two male Red Panda cubs.

The birth, from the zoo’s 4-year-old panda, Starlight, happened on June 20 and was just announced on Saturday. It is the first Red Panda birthing in the 128 years of the Seneca Park Zoo.

“The birth of the two Red Panda cubs is exciting for the Seneca Park Zoo and our community, and is encouraging news for ensuring the sustainability of red panda populations,” said Monroe County Executive Adam Bello.

More arts & life stories

From the Inclusion Desk

Racquel Stephen / WXXI News

As a line of golf carts wound their way around the Sunshine Camp in Rush on Monday, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul stopped and got out so she could take in the view from the camp's new treehouse.

"This is incredible," Hochul said after walking up a ramp and making her way to the treehouse's large deck.

She was visiting the camp for children with disabilities on the Americans with Disabilities Act's 31st anniversary.

www.ddawny.org

A statewide group that provides services to people with developmental disabilities is calling on lawmakers to take action to address what they say is a severe staffing shortage and pay inequities.

“We're at a crisis point, really, we're unable to hire and retain people into these positions,” said Wendy McCarthy, executive director of the Developmental Disabilities Alliance of Western New York, or DDAWNY.

She said the developmental disabilities service system is in an emergency because of the inability to recruit and retain direct support professionals.

Emma Benz

 

 

 

Like so many students around the world, Owen Penniston had a tough school year during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

"I felt really isolated,” the 12-year-old said.

 

Remote instruction just wasn't a good fit for Owen, who is on the autism spectrum.

 

“I don’t have my teachers here and it sometimes gets really hard to learn," he said. "Especially with the computer often giving you the answers.”

 

Max Schulte / WXXI News

The pandemic has shed light on disparities within the Black community. In addition to systematic racism, lack of access to health information and health literacy, there are additional barriers that affect Black deaf people who are a minority in an already marginalized group.

When LeeAnne Valentine walks into a medical facility, she is hyper-aware of these barriers. Valentine is a deaf Black woman and communicates using American Sign Language.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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