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Governor Cuomo's office

Busy day at Capitol features governor's budget and transgender rights

The New York State Legislature for the first time granted civil rights to transgender New Yorkers. And on a busy day at the State Capitol, Gov. Andrew Cuomo also released his $175 billion budget plan. Senate sponsor Brad Hoylman got a bit emotional on the Senate floor when he spoke about the provisions of a measure that will add “gender identity” and “gender expression” as a protected class in the state’s human rights laws, outlawing discrimination in employment and housing. “All of these New...

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Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren is pleased with some initiatives and budget plans outlined  by Governor Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday.

Cuomo is proposing another $25 million in state aid toward anti-poverty efforts in Rochester.

That includes $10 million for the Rochester Revitalization Fund, which the mayor says will help support entrepreneurship in the city.

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand says she is running for president, joining a growing number of Democrats who are seeking to challenge President Trump in 2020.

Gillbrand announced her decision on CBS's The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, saying she is filing her exploratory committee for the White House on Tuesday evening.

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Governor Cuomo's office

The New York State Legislature for the first time granted civil rights to transgender New Yorkers. And on a busy day at the State Capitol, Gov. Andrew Cuomo also released his $175 billion budget plan.

Senate sponsor Brad Hoylman got a bit emotional on the Senate floor when he spoke about the provisions of a measure that will add “gender identity” and “gender expression” as a protected class in the state’s human rights laws, outlawing discrimination in employment and housing.

Rewatch the 2019 State of the State and budget address delivered by Governor Andrew Cuomo Tuesday in Albany, courtesy of New York Now

It's Dialogue on Disability Week and we kick off our series of conversations on Connections with a discussion about inclusive recreation activities.

The film “Perfectly Normal for Me” tells the story of three children with disabilities as they prepare for a spring recital as part of their after school dance program. We preview the film and talk with local parents, teachers, and education coordinators about finding a balance between independence and structure for children with special needs, and what inclusion really means. In studio:

The new Congress is considering measures related to the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement. The Palestinian-led campaign promotes forms of boycott against Israel with the goal of what it describes as ending Israeli violations of international law.

Our guests explain the debate over BDS and its potential impact. In studio:

  • Iman Abid, chapter director for the Genesee Valley Region of the ACLU
  • Larry Fine, former longtime CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Rochester

Two important pieces of legislation for LGBTQ+ New Yorkers passed Tuesday in the state Senate.

GENDA, or the Gender Expression Non Discrimination Act,  has officially passed and will increase protections for transgender and gender non-conforming New York citizens.

Tamara Leigh, communications director at the Out Alliance, said that up until now, there was no New York state law that explicitly protected this group of people from harassment and discrimination in areas like employment and housing.

freeimages.com/Mike Moloney

Studies suggest musicians are four times more likely than others to experience hearing loss due to their repeated exposure to loud, prolonged rehearsals and performances.

Dr. Greg Horton, an audiologist at Rochester Hearing and Speech Center, understands this from his own experience. He's played drums and bass for various bands over the past twenty years. He remembers attending a Ramones concert when he was 17.

www.jesuitseast.org

McQuaid Jesuit High School is responding after regional leaders of the Jesuits released a list on Tuesday of clergy who had credible allegations of abuse against a minor or vulnerable adult since 1950.

That list from the USA Northeast Province for the Jesuits includes the names of seven clergy, living or deceased, who once served at McQuaid.

Here is the list provided by McQuaid:

Updated at 5:08 p.m. ET

A federal judge in New York has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman ordered the administration to stop its plans to include the controversial question on forms for the upcoming national head count "without curing the legal defects" the judge identified in his 277-page opinion released on Tuesday.

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Netflix has raised its prices for U.S. viewers, as the company invests in original content amid growing competition from other streaming services.

The company's most popular subscription plan, which allows high-definition viewing on two screens, has jumped from $10.99 to $12.99 per month. Its cheapest, non-HD plan has risen from $7.99 to $8.99, and its premium plan from $13.99 to $15.99.

A Washington, D.C., judge ruled Tuesday that furloughed federal workers who are not getting paid because of a government shutdown must continue to do their jobs.

It's a setback for the workers who brought the lawsuit against the Trump administration.

"Calling people back to work, as the federal government is doing, without paying them is unlawful," attorney Gregory O'Duden tells NPR. O'Duden is general counsel for the National Treasury Employees Union that brought the suit in consolidation with a claim from the National Air Traffic Controllers Association.

The man who fatally shot Hadiya Pendleton, 15-year-old girl whose death became a symbol of the rampant gun violence plaguing Chicago, was sentenced Monday to 84 years in prison.

The convicted gunman, Micheail Ward, did not receive a life sentence as Hadiya's mother, Cleopatra Cowley had asked the court, but he will likely spend the rest of his life in prison for killing the girl and injuring two other people.

Ward is 24 years old.

More than half of the workforce of the Internal Revenue Service, or about 46,000 employees, will be recalled to work for the tax filing season despite the partial government shutdown, according to a Treasury Department announcement.

The recalled employees will not be paid during the shutdown, now in its fourth week, although all federal workers have been promised back pay when funding is approved.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Special Olympics NY

The Special Olympics Winter Games are taking place around Rochester again this year, Friday February 22nd and Saturday the 23rd.

1,000 athletes from across state will be in the area, competing in six winter sports spread out from Swain resort to the Riverside Convention Center; with sports including Alpine and cross country skiing, figure skating and snowboarding.

Stacey Hengsterman is the President and CEO of Special Olympics New York.

Lorenzo Destefano

When Rachel Flowers was born 15 weeks premature in 1993, she weighed just one and a half pounds. She lost her vision three months later due to a condition called retinopathy of prematurity. 

But when you talk to Rachel today, there's no sense of loss, disability, or limitations. The 25-year old music prodigy's world is vast and full of potential. By the time she was 4 years old, Rachel was playing Bach fugues on the piano seemingly with little effort. 

Now, with a flourishing music career, she composes her own songs and has befriended and sometimes performs with artists who have inspired her: Arturo Sandoval, Carl Palmer and Dweezil Zappa. 

WXXI’s Inclusion Desk is the news arm of the station's Move to Include initiative, which is a partnership to encourage thoughtful discussion about issues of inclusion and the differently abled.

And 2018 brought about a lot of these stories, from tragedy to triumph, arts, sports and new initiatives.

Caitlin Whyte and Denise Young from WXXI’s Inclusion Desk talk about the stories that affected those in our communities with disabilities in 2018.

The spiritual practice of yoga is said to have immense health benefits. A reduction in fatigue, anxiety, and inflammation, plus an improved mood, are just a few of the many upsides. But when you see common yoga poses like downward facing dog, tree pose, and half-moon, it would appear as though the healing benefits are only available for a certain percentage of our population….specifically those without mobility disabilities. But that is not the case in Rochester. On this edition of Need to Know, the impact of adaptive yoga on area residents.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

A wide-reaching epidemic

WXXI, in partnership with public broadcasting stations across New York state, is airing special programming examining the opioid crisis.

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