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PathStone and Geva to build new building on Monroe Avenue

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren has recommended that the nonprofit organization PathStone build on the last available part of the Inner Loop redevelopment near Monroe Avenue and Chestnut Street. The proposed building has its first tenant: Geva. The theater’s artistic director, Mark Cuddy, said they’re out of space at their current location and want to use 5,900 square feet of the building to expand. “We’ll have year-round classes, year-round engagement, community events, it’s an opportunity for...

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James Brown WXXI

Nazareth College says 1 in 3 of its teachers are adjuncts, and on Thursday, the demand for higher wages by many of  them was discussed in a news conference called by those faculty members and their union.

Colleen Wolff teaches french horn at Nazareth College. She’s one of the adjuncts who protested low salaries and short term appointments with SEIU Local 200. 

Wolff said the school commits to adjuncts on a semester by semester basis.

Congressman Tom Reed (R-Corning)

Congressman Tom Reed is out of the hospital now after he collapsed just prior to a television appearance in Washington, D.C. on Thursday afternoon. It happened in the rotunda of the Cannon House Office Building.

Various media outlets, including Spectrum News reporter Samantha-Jo Roth, have reported that Reed collapsed just before an appearance on Fox.

Roth tweeted that the Southern Tier Republican was conscious and speaking before paramedics arrived.

According to an American Psychiatric Association poll, 39 percent of Americans said they were more anxious in 2018 than they were the previous year. Mindfulness training has emerged as a popular method to address anxiety and stress – both at work and at home.

This hour, we discuss one approach to mindfulness – Buddhist meditation – with two teachers. They share meditation techniques and talk about why they think this approach to mindfulness can be effective in responding to life’s challenges. In studio:

How are race, culture, and architecture connected? The question is the focus of an upcoming presentation at the University of Rochester led by Bryan C. Lee, Jr. Lee is a design justice advocate whose work focuses on creating spaces that are equitable and accessible to people of all backgrounds.

He’s in Rochester to speak about the policies and practices he thinks will be most effective in creating those spaces. He joins us to explore his ideas, and we discuss how they can be applied to our community. In studio:

  • Bryan C. Lee, Jr., design justice advocate and the director of the New Orleans-based design-justice nonprofit Colloqate
  • Kathryn Mariner, assistant professor in the University of Rochester’s Anthropology Department and Visual and Cultural Studies program
  • Nana-Yaw Andoh, assistant professor of architecture at RIT, and board member for the Community Design Center Rochester

panasonic.com

A well-known name in the electronics industry is coming to downtown Rochester. Panasonic, which earlier this year acquired a division belonging to a local high-tech company called Omni-ID, will be taking up some space in the first Federal Building.

Panasonic will have operations on the 1st and 21st floor of that building. The unit, Omni-ID's 'Industrial Internet of Things Solutions Group' previously was located at Eastman Business Park.

Henry McDonald was born in Haiti in 1890 but when he was 5, his parents allowed an American coconut importer to adopt him and bring him to Canandaigua, believing he’d have better opportunities in America. He wouldn’t see his mother again until he was in his 60s, he told the Democrat and Chronicle.

McDonald spent his life in the Finger Lakes region, where he shined as an athlete at Canandaigua Academy and East High School. 

Scott Pitoniak, a longtime sports columnist and author, called him a forgotten pioneer.

City of Rochester

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren has recommended that the nonprofit organization PathStone build on the last available part of the Inner Loop redevelopment near Monroe Avenue and Chestnut Street. The proposed building has its first tenant: Geva.   

The theater’s artistic director, Mark Cuddy, said they’re out of space at their current location and want to use 5,900 square feet of the building to expand.

“We’ll have year-round classes, year-round engagement, community events, it’s an opportunity for us for more participation,” said Cuddy.

Updated at 4:10 p.m. ET

Swaths of southeast Texas were underwater Thursday after Tropical Depression Imelda caused catastrophic flooding. Scores of residents had to be carried through the floodwaters and motorists needed to be rescued from submerged vehicles. Children were forced to shelter in place at schools in Houston.

https://events.rochester.edu/event/humanities_center_public_lecture_5498?utm_campaign=widget&utm_medium=widget&utm_source=University+of+Rochester+Calendar#.XYOY0y5KiCg

First hour: How are race, culture, and architecture connected?

Second hour: How meditation can help relieve anxiety

monroecc.edu

Monroe Community College President Anne Kress is a finalist to lead Northern Virginia Community College.

According to the news release on that college’s website, Kress is one of three finalists. Northern Virginia Community College enrolls more than 75,000 at its six campuses and is the largest institution of higher education in Virginia.

Kress has been president at MCC since 2009, and she is also co-chair of the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council.

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News from NPR

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau apologized after after photos surfaced showing him wearing brownface and blackface as a young man, saying he has no plans to resign and vowing to continue his campaign for re-election in October.

"Darkening your face, regardless of the context or the circumstances, is always unacceptable because of the racist history of black face," Trudeau said at a news conference Thursday in a public park in Winnipeg. "I should have understood that then and I never should have done it."

Purdue Pharma, facing a mountain of litigation linked to the opioid epidemic, filed for bankruptcy in New York this week. The OxyContin manufacturer and its owners, the Sackler family, have offered to pay billions of dollars to cities and counties hit hard by the addiction crisis.

But that's not good enough for critics such as U.S. Rep. Max Rose.

It has been a week since the disturbing discovery of thousands of fetal remains at the home of a former abortion provider, and authorities still don't know why he kept them.

Ulrich Klopfer had performed abortions at three clinics in Indiana but lived across the state line in Illinois.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

We want to warn you that some listeners may find this next story disturbing. Today we learn more about a case in Illinois involving the discovery of thousands of fetal remains at the home of a former abortion provider. After Ulrich Klopfer died earlier this month, the remains were discovered in his garage. Authorities in Illinois released more information today. NPR's Sarah McCammon attended a press conference at the Will County sheriff's office outside Chicago and joins us now.

Hi, Sarah.

SARAH MCCAMMON, BYLINE: Hi, Ari.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

A new center for people with autism and their families has opened in Rochester.

The Golisano Autism Center is a “one-stop hub” for services and support for people with autism, said Ann Costello, director of the Golisano Foundation.

We talk about adaptive sports for kids with disabilities. It's in advance of the Little League World Series Challenger Exhibition Game, which will air on WXXI-TV this weekend.

The Challenger division includes children with physical and intellectual disabilities, and we have a Challenger program here in Rochester.

We'll talk to an organizer and a player with the Webster Challenger program, and we'll talk to an organizer and camper at Camp Abilities -- a camp for kids with visual impairments. It's a conversation about inclusion and more. 

Guests are:

  • Ron Kampff, organizer of the Webster Challenger Baseball League
  • Anthony Vignare, member of the Webster Challenger Baseball Team
  • Matthew Farwell, Camp Abilities graduate assistant
  • Chris Smoker, camper at Camp Abilities   

This story was produced by WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, focusing on disabilities and inclusion.

www.wegmans.com

Wegmans is offering families who have young children with mobility restrictions a new way to help their kids shop with their parents or other adult relatives.

It’s a specially adapted shopping cart, called ‘Go to Shop,‘ that Wegmans is getting through a company called Firefly.

Linda Lovejoy is a community relations manager for Wegmans. She said this shopping cart is different from other carts that Wegmans already makes available for kids or adults with disabilities.

Noelle Evans

  

The American Council of the Blind, an advocacy group for the rights of visually impaired and blind people, elected new leadership at the organization’s 58th Annual Conference and Convention in Rochester.

Around 1,200 people attended, along with roughly 300 guide dogs at the Riverside Convention Center for the week-long event, which wrapped up Friday.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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