WXXI AM News

Top Stories

Roger Stone Sentenced To More Than 3 Years Amid Furor Over Trump And DOJ

Updated at 3:23 p.m. ET A federal judge sentenced Roger Stone, a political adviser to President Trump, to more than three years in prison on Thursday amid an uproar about what critics call Trump's interference in the workings of justice. Judge Amy Berman Jackson found herself in the middle of a political sandstorm as she and the parties closed in on sentencing for Stone following his conviction last year. Stone also was ordered to pay a $20,000 fine and to serve two years of supervised...

Read More
Provided by Linda Mazur

Linda Mazur was stunned when she and her daughter went shopping and she saw in the dressing room how thin she was.

It was 2007, and Emilee Mazur was 24 years old. It was the first time her mother realized her daughter had anorexia nervosa.

"Emilee was the last person you would think this would have happened to," said Linda. "She was smart, bright, social, athletic, compassionate friend."

But anorexia doesn't discriminate.

Karen DeWitt

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is again pressing for a ban on flavored tobacco-based vaping products, saying he hopes a law is passed in the next month. 

Cuomo and his health commissioner, Dr. Howard Zucker, tried to ban the products in New York last fall after a widespread illness associated with vaping killed 60 people, including four in New York.

But the emergency order by a state panel was stopped in court after the vaping industry sued.

An exhibit set to open Friday at the Visual Studies Workshop is exploring perceptions of Black masculinity and gender identity.

We talk with artist Joshua Rashaad McFadden about “Evidence,” and our guests discuss what it means to be a Black man in America today. In studio:

  • Joshua Rashaad McFadden, visual artist
  • Gatekeeper Adrian, artist, activist, photographer, filmmaker, organizer, and founder and chair of Rochester Black Pride
  • Jonathan Ntheketha, performance educator with Impact Interactive
  • Brandon Stroud, yoga instructor, and residence coordinator at RIT

Karen DeWitt

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday that as New York prepares to make adult recreational marijuana use legal, he plans to soon visit states where marijuana is legal to get some tips on what did and did not work for them. 

Cuomo said he’ll go to California, Colorado, Illinois and Massachusetts in the coming weeks to meet with officials there and find out how they are carrying out the monitoring, sale and taxing of the drug and whether they have any revenue streams devoted to lower-income communities adversely affected by marijuana prohibition.

We're joined by philanthropist and Paychex founder Tom Golisano. He's written a new book, titled “Built, Not Born.” It's about the mechanics of building a successful business.

We talk to him about his strategies and what he thinks current and aspiring business owners can learn from his story and experiences.

  • Tom Golisano, philanthropist, and founder of Paychex

Updated at 3:23 p.m. ET

A federal judge sentenced Roger Stone, a political adviser to President Trump, to more than three years in prison on Thursday amid an uproar about what critics call Trump's interference in the workings of justice.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson found herself in the middle of a political sandstorm as she and the parties closed in on sentencing for Stone following his conviction last year.

Stone also was ordered to pay a $20,000 fine and to serve two years of supervised release.

Albany is putting on a campaign to make sure firefighters in New York know how to protect themselves from the array of dangerous chemicals that can be found on their turnout gear at a fire.


Updated at 2 p.m. ET

The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in South Korea has doubled in just 24 hours, to 104 from 51, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. Many of the new cases of coronavirus are linked to a Christian sect in Daegu, a city in southern South Korea.

Korea's CDC says a woman who became the country's 31st confirmed patient on Feb. 18 had attended services held by a religious group called the Shincheonji Church of Jesus, The Temple of the Tabernacle of the Testimony.

First hour: Tom Golisano on his new book, "Built, Not Born"

Second hour: Discussing perceptions of Black masculinity and gender identity

In Las Vegas — a city known for prize fights — the Democrats were gloves off.

And a new entrant in the ring took a lot of incoming: former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has spent more than $300 million of his own money on ads to raise his profile.

Pages

Across the Universe with Jeff Spevak

Traci Westcott/Sarah Eide

No square on the calendar seems to have escaped. "Extraterrestrial Abduction Day" is March 20. Entire months have been claimed. November is NaNoWriMo. Translation: National Novel Writing Month. And now we're in the midst of FAWM: February Album Writing Month.

News from NPR

More than two decades after it went missing, a ceremonial crown dating back to the 18th century has found its way home to Ethiopia. The country's prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, received the glistening artifact at a ceremony Thursday in Addis Ababa, in a triumphant end to a twisty saga that transcends national borders.

Forever 21, the fast-fashion mall standby that filed for bankruptcy last year, will live on. Three companies announced Wednesday that they are jointly acquiring the retailer aimed at young shoppers and that they plan to continue to operate its U.S. and international stores.

The buyers are Authentic Brands Group, which owns major brands such as Barneys New York, Aeropostale and Nine West; and real estate companies Simon Property Group and Brookfield Property Partners.

What's it like living with a coronavirus infection, isolated in a biocontainment unit? For Carl Goldman, diagnosed this week in Nebraska, his condition doesn't feel any different than a typical cold, he tells NPR's Noel King. But the treatment is unusual: Doctors visit him each day wearing Hazmat suits, and hospital staff wave at him from behind double-sealed windows.

Updated at 3:23 p.m. ET

A federal judge sentenced Roger Stone, a political adviser to President Trump, to more than three years in prison on Thursday amid an uproar about what critics call Trump's interference in the workings of justice.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson found herself in the middle of a political sandstorm as she and the parties closed in on sentencing for Stone following his conviction last year.

Stone also was ordered to pay a $20,000 fine and to serve two years of supervised release.

More news from NPR

Arts & Life

Provided

Comedians Steve Martin and Martin Short is the latest show to be announced for the Constellation Brands-Marvin Sands Performing Arts Center.

Billed in typically self-deprecating fashion as “The Funniest Show In Town At The Moment,” they have an 8 p.m. Aug. 29 gig at the outdoor venue near Canandaigua.

Jeanne Fisher/WXXI

The Gateways Music Festival is dragging classical music into the 21st century. 

On Monday, organizers of the event designed to create exposure for classical musicians of black or African descent will announce three significant changes to the 26-year-old festival.

More arts & life stories

From the Inclusion Desk

Acclaimed Irish tenor and Paralympian Ronan Tynan is coming to Rochester to speak and sing at two events. Tynan was born with phocomelia, a lower limb disability that caused both of his legs to be underdeveloped. At the age of 20, both of Tynan’s legs were amputated after a car accident. Since that time, he has used prosthetic legs and won Paralympic medals in track and field. He’s also a physician specializing in orthopedic sports injuries and has worked in the prosthetics industry.

This hour, Tynan joins us to discuss his life and work, his career with the Irish Tenors, and more. We also talk with locals being recognized for their work promoting inclusion. Our guests:

sixflags.com/darienlake

Six Flags Darien Lake, and the other 25 Six Flags parks nationwide, has earned a "Certified Autism Center" designation, the first ever family of parks to get that classification.

The designation comes from the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards, which meets the credentialing needs of professionals who work with individuals with special needs and cognitive disorders.

Autism Nature Trail

Five years ago, a retired school administrator from Batavia named Loren Penman had a conversation with her neighbor. What she didn’t know then is that talk would inspire the next phase of her life. 

Penman said her neighbor was hoping that her grandson Ali, who lives in Albany, could get back to Letchworth State Park soon. She told Penman that Ali was a different kid inside the park.

We wrap up our annual Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about sports, media, and inclusion. Special Olympics New York is celebrating 50 years. We’re joined by an athlete who has been part of the program for 40 years, as well as RIT photojournalism students who have covered athletes’ stories.

We discuss how sports can help people discover new abilities and strengths, and how effective media coverage can help create a more inclusive society. In studio:

  • Patty VanSavage, athlete and member of the Great Tigers Club
  • John VanSavage, Patty’s brother and coach with the Great Tigers Club
  • Stacey Hengsterman, president and CEO of Special Olympics New York
  • Jenn Poggi, assistant professor of photojournalism at RIT
  • Josh Meltzer, assistant professor of photojournalism at RIT
  • Jackie Diller, photojournalism major at RIT
  • Ashley Crichton, advertising photography major at RIT

This story is reported from WXXI's Inclusion Desk.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Meet the WXXI News Team

The reporters you hear everyday