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Trump And Biden Had A Real Debate, And 4 Other Takeaways

President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden met for their second and final debate as tens of millions of Americans have already voted. A deeply divided country begins its final sprint to Election Day amid the coronavirus pandemic, and it's unclear how many voters have yet to make up their minds. Here are five takeaways from the debate in Nashville, Tenn., a much different — and far more civil — night than the last encounter. NPR / YouTube 1. There was a real debate The first debate...

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Ask your question to the candidates

55th State Senate District candidates Samra Brouk (D) and Chris Missick (R) debate on Monday, October 26 at 8 p.m. on WXXI-TV/AM 1370/FM 107.5

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office file photo

Hospitalizations in New York due to COVID-19 have more than doubled over the last month, with the state reporting more than 1,000 hospitalizations Friday for the first time in four months.

Hospitalizations were up to 1,023 on Thursday, according to data released by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Friday. Exactly one month ago Friday, hospitalizations were at 490 in New York.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Monroe County Department of Public Health has reported another spike in the number of daily positive cases for COVID-19.

On Friday, officials said they saw 78 newly confirmed cases, with a number of those cases involving individuals in the 10 to 19 age range as well as men in their 20s.

At St. John Fisher College, which announced earlier in the week it would move to all-remote learning for the rest of the fall semester, reported 95 confirmed cases of COVID-19 through October 23.

Gino Fanelli/CITY

The executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union said Friday that the organization was investigating comments made by the head of its Rochester chapter that were construed by many to be a threat against employees of the Monroe County District Attorney's Office.

The remarks were made a day earlier by Iman Abid-Thompson, the director of the Genesee Valley Chapter of the NYCLU during a small protest outside of the District Attorney's Office in which she said into a microphone, "We know your names. We know where your children go to school."

We discuss the latest in breast cancer screening, research, and treatment. Local doctors say there are misconceptions and confusion about who should be screened and when. They help us understand the guidelines, the role of breast density and genetics in diagnosis, and more. We also hear from a breast cancer patient who shares her story.

Our guests:

  • Avice O’Connell, M.D., director of women’s imaging and professor in the Department of Imaging Sciences at the University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Carla Falkson, M.D., medical director of Pluta Cancer Center, and professor of oncology at the Wilmot Cancer Institute
  • Carol Lustig, RN, assistant clinical director of the Hereditary Cancer Program at Wilmot Cancer Institute
  • Steph Tubman, breast cancer patient, and member of the Young Survival Coalition

We talk with the two candidates for Monroe County Court Judge. Democrat Meredith Vacca and Republican Derek Harnsberger are both assistant district attorneys. They discuss why they're seeking the judgeship and explain their work on the bench. 

Our guests:

provided photo

Gallina Development has unveiled plans for a redevelopment of the former Xerox Tower building Xerox Square that would focus on bringing hundreds of college students from multiple institutions into that campus downtown.

Company President Andy Gallina said that Innovation Square, as it will be known, would house 450 or more upper level and graduate students from various colleges, providing an alternative to traditional on-campus housing

James Brown / WXXI News

Rochester Police announced a series of appointments to its command staff Thursday, including a new deputy executive chief.

Andre Anderson will join the department as second-in-command behind new interim Chief Cynthia Herriott.

First hour: Candidates for Monroe County Court Judge

Second hour: Understanding the latest in breast cancer screening, research, and treatment

Minor parties in New York face strict new rules this year to keep their candidates on the ballot without having to resort to petitioning for thousands of signatures, and one is making an all-out effort to boost votes on its line.

President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden met for their second and final debate as tens of millions of Americans have already voted. A deeply divided country begins its final sprint to Election Day amid the coronavirus pandemic, and it's unclear how many voters have yet to make up their minds.

Here are five takeaways from the debate in Nashville, Tenn., a much different — and far more civil — night than the last encounter.

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2020 Election Guide

With the lack of live, in-person music happening, WXXI is still bringing the artists you love to you - to your home, from the artists homes. Welcome to HomeStage.

Just because you're stuck in the house doesn't mean there's nothing to do. Check out all the virtual events on the CITY event calendar you can be a part of!

Across the Universe with Jeff Spevak

Warner Bros. Pictures

A murmur of excitement rolled through the area’s movie-going community, long in coronavirus limbo, when word came out early Saturday afternoon that Gov. Andrew Cuomo had just announced that theaters throughout the state – umm, except you, New York City -- could reopen as of this Friday.

The news seemed to catch everyone by surprise. Then reality hit: Restarting an industry is not as simple as firing up the popcorn machine and hitting the projector “on” switch.

News from NPR

A NASA spacecraft sent out to collect a sample of rock and dust from an asteroid has nabbed so much that it's actually created an unexpected problem.

Rocks are jammed in the device in a way that's keeping a Mylar flap open, creating a gap that's letting some of the collected pebbles and dust drift out into space.

The European Parliament came together Friday to vote on a variety of issues, including whether a veggie burger is a burger.

Farmer lobbyists argued no. Environmentalists said yes.

The Parliament said yes, too, in a decisive vote against a measure that would ban plant-based meat alternatives from being referred to by the names of their meat counterparts. This means terms like steak, sausage and burger.

Each week, we answer frequently asked questions about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions."

Is it safe to eat in an outdoor plastic dome?

Oh, to dine in a giant plastic bubble ...

In front of television cameras on Friday, President Trump chatted with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu over speaker phone, lauding a new agreement between Israel and Sudan to normalize relations. Two hours later in Wilmington, Del., Democratic nominee Joe Biden outlined his plans to combat the coronavirus pandemic, a graphic of the country's spiking daily case counts flanking the stage.

More news from NPR

Arts & Life

rpo.org

Curt Long, President and CEO of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, says orchestras across the country are looking for answers on how to perform music in a pandemic, and in each city, the challenges are somewhat different. In New York City, the New York Philharmonic is canceling its entire season for the first time in its 178-year history.

One way the RPO is keeping the music playing is with live-streamed concerts. Those kicked off in September, and Long says those performances a work in progress.

HomeStage: Womba Africa

Oct 13, 2020

Drum and dance group Womba Africa's name means "We are coming," as in, We are coming to you with something new, something exciting. Get ready.

The group faced multiple obstacles to come from Ghana, and they have a vision to promote West African music and culture and to empower indigenous cultural groups to also share their heritage through preforming arts.

More arts & life stories

From the Inclusion Desk

An effort by the parents of a Gates Chili student with disabilities to allow their daughter to use a service dog has been settled eight years after that battle began.

Devyn Pereira needed the dog to help her get through the school day, but the district said her parents would need to provide a full-time dog handler.

Five years ago, the U.S. Justice Department sued on behalf of Devyn, and this week, the settlement was announced.

Devyn’s mother, Heather Burroughs, was pleased with the resolution of the long-pending case.

Willow and Deaf IGNITE announce partnership

Aug 4, 2020
deafignite.org

Two organizations that have collaborated for several years have now announced a formal partnership to strengthen the ways this community responds to domestic violence and increase access to services and programs.

Willow Center President and CEO Meaghan de Chateauview says staff from Deaf IGNITE, which advocates for Deaf domestic violence survivors, will join Willow, so now the center can offer specialized services.

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Gerard Buckley still clearly remembers July 26, 1990.

On that day, he stood alongside dozens of others in the White House Rose Garden, as then-President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act into law.

"It was really amazing," Buckley recalled. "It was everything I wish the country was today. The Republicans, the Democrats, the independents, the business community, leaders from the disability community all came together."

That day, Buckley was a young deaf man. Today, he is president of RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

Max Schulte / WXXI News

Until recently, Sherrodney Fulmore rode a bus to get to and from his job at Wegmans.

From his home in Rochester’s 19th Ward to the Holt Road Wegmans in Webster, the trip usually took about an hour, he said.

Fulmore rode on the Regional Transit Service’s Access buses -- the smaller shuttle-size buses that offer curb-to-curb service for people with disabilities.

But when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Rochester area, Fulmore stopped riding the bus.

“We wanted to cut the chance of him getting sick,” said his father, Frank Fulmore.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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