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Michael Weakens After Historic Slam Into Florida Panhandle

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET Thursday
Tropical Storm Michael is weakening as it churns across south-central Georgia. On Wednesday, Michael was the strongest hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. in more than a quarter-century, according to the National Hurricane Center . At least one person has died from complications related to the storm. Gadsden County, Fla., Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Anglie Hightower told NPR the man was killed after a tree fell through the roof of his...

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www.lollypop.org

Lollypop Farm, the Humane Society of Greater Rochester will be closed to the public on Saturday, for what is being called “a precautionary deep clean” of the organization’s main Fairport location and adoption center in the Greece Ridge Mall.

Officials at Lollypop Farm say that  a number of kittens admitted to the shelter were diagnosed by the facility’s veterinary clinic as having feline panleukopenia virus (also known as feline distemper), a highly contagious viral disease that can threaten the life of kittens and cats.

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

A sharply divided Senate — reflecting a deeply divided nation — voted almost entirely along party lines Saturday afternoon to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A little more than two hours later, Kavauangh was sworn in during a private ceremony as protesters stood on the court's steps.

NEW YORK (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has accepted the ballot line of the liberal Working Families Party in next month's general election.

Cuomo said Friday through a spokeswoman that he would accept the ballot line of the party that earlier backed his Democratic primary opponent, actress Cynthia Nixon.

Working Families Party leaders said Wednesday they would offer the party's ballot line to Cuomo, a two-term incumbent.

Cuomo's acceptance means his name will appear on the November ballot under the Democratic, Independence and Working Families lines.

Marie Kraus / Seneca Park Zoo

The Seneca Park Zoo has again earned what Monroe County officials called a “prestigious” honor from a national group.

The Association of Zoos and Aquariums recognized the zoo as a “world-class” institution with “the highest-quality animal care.”

Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo said the process for gaining accreditation is rigorous. It involves a 31-page questionnaire, an inspection by zoo association officials and an interview with the association’s experts.

Batavia shoe manufacturer shuts down

Oct 5, 2018

A western New York footwear manufacturing company founded by two Civil War veteran brothers more than 150 years ago has closed, putting its 82 employees out of work.

P.W. Minor in Batavia shut down Friday. A layoff notice filed with the state Department of Labor said the company would close Oct. 5. A layoff notice filed in September had said the company planned to cut 45 jobs but remain open.

The company said it closed for economic reasons.

Chief Operating Officer Hundley Elliotte thanked employees for their dedication and work.

Updated 6:33 p.m. ET

White Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke has been found guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of black teenager Laquan McDonald.

It took the jury of eight women and four men about eight hours to reach a verdict.

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Fashion Week of Rochester, and the story of a young designer, Christopher Washington;
  • Employment for people with disabilities, with former Senator Tom Harkin;
  • Indigenous Peoples' Day;
  • Gentrification.

A new play at the JCC CenterStage Theatre explores the life and work of Dr. Ruth Westheimer. The radio and television sex therapist has helped change the way America talks about sexual health.

We’re joined by members of the production and local sex therapists who discuss sex education, sexual medicine, and more. In studio:

We welcome a panel of attorneys to discuss the primary, and sometimes hidden, legal questions at play in the Kavanaugh hearings. We find that when attorneys from all ideological backgrounds discuss the hearings, they tend to focus on things that the lay public does not.

We explore those issues with our guests:

  • Sharon Stiller, partner and director of the employment law practice at Abrams, Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara, Wolf & Carone, LLP
  • Chris Thomas, partner with Nixon Peabody
  • Melanie S. Wolk, Esq. partner at Trevett Cristo
  • Sharon Kelly Sayers, Esq., local attorney

Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins, a retired UPS worker from Syracuse and former Vietnam war protester, is running for governor for the third time, challenging popular incumbent Andrew Cuomo from the left.

Hawkins, in a conversation with WXXI’s Karen DeWitt, explains why he thinks he is a true alternative and not just a protest vote.

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News from NPR

Dave Huhn is a sheriff's deputy for Montezuma County, Colo., a stretch of sagebrush mesas and sandstone cliffs bordering Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, home to Mesa Verde National Park, where ancestral Puebloans' cliff dwellings still stand.

Huhn specializes in the complex world of water law. His job has become more important in this region after a series of hot, dry summers have made farmers more desperate for water, and more willing to steal it, or go to battle over it.

"You're bouncing off the atmosphere."

Early in director Damien Chazelle's First Man, this is one of the cautions given to Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) during his pilot training, years before he walked on the moon. That idea of the barrier between Earth and space, the violence of making the journey through it and the almost mystical experience of being on the other side of it forms the spine of the film.

Alyssa Edwards (née Justin Dwayne Lee Johnson) is a lot.

She has to be; she's a drag queen. Being a lot comes with the lace-front wig. A drag queen who isn't a lot is no drag queen at all; she's food without flavor, art without color, Cher without Auto-tune. It's the difference, more specifically, between a fierce and fabulous queen like RuPaul and that one jock in high school who slapped on a Halloween store wig and stuffed himself into his girlfriend's cheerleading outfit for school spirit day.

President Trump warned at his rally in Pennsylvania on Wednesday night that if his party loses in November's midterm elections, the "radical Democrat mob" will take away everything he's achieved since his election, while encouraging crime and socialism.

It was an echo of a tweet he sent over the weekend and used again at a rally in Iowa on Tuesday — giving rise to a line that Republicans have been quick to seize upon as they try to sustain a newly-enthused GOP base in the wake of the divisive confirmation battle for now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Beth Adams/WXXI News

In celebration of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a local nonprofit is recognizing a long-time employee.

Young Kim is 37 years old. She's been working at Unistel Industries on Blossom Road in Rochester since 2002.

Unistel is a nonprofit that provides job training and placement for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Young and her colleagues work on assembly lines at the company, which is the country's number one supplier of spices for the U.S. military.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

You may have seen pictures of two local men go viral: a barber giving a man a haircut on the sidewalk because the shop wasn’t accessible by wheelchair.

But since the story went national, it’s raised questions about how people with disabilities are covered in the media.

Devin Hamilton is 30 years old. He's an engineer working in Webster, and he has cerebral palsy. He says one day, he decided to get a haircut at Joe's Upscale Barbershop, a few blocks from where he works. But when he rode his wheelchair over there, he didn't see a ramp.

We're joined by former Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa, who authored the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Research shows that among similarly sized cities, Rochester is the single worst in the country when it comes to employment and poverty for people with disabilities. 

Harkin is the keynote speaker for the upcoming ROC EmployABILITY conference, which is focused on increasing employment opportunities and reducing poverty among people with disabilities. We preview that conference. In studio:

INTELLIGENT LIVES

In Rochester, the graduation rate for students with disabilities is 22 percent* compared to 40 percent nationally.  The median individual earnings for those with disabilities is $14,450. This is $4,000 below the national median.  That means Rochester’s disabled community is the poorest in the nation when compared to the 75 largest metropolitan areas.

Despite the systemic challenges of educational segregation and stereotypes, adults with intellectual disabilities are challenging the perceptions of intelligence as they navigate high school, college, and the workforce.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

What's the ripple effect of the opioid crisis?

WXXI News looks at the people, places, and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis

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