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'This Is A War Zone': Hurricane Michael Leaves Deadly Trail Through Southeast

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water. Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina. More than 1 million people are without electricity, and areas along the Gulf Coast and elsewhere...

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Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water.

Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina.

NYS Canal Corp.

The New York Power Authority and the New York State Canal Corporation say they will not appeal  a  court decision that halted a controversial program that involved the clear-cutting of trees along the embankment of the Erie Canal.

Instead, state officials say they will move forward with a comprehensive environmental review of the program across the entire canal system, not just the towns that took legal action which include Brighton, Perinton and Pittsord.

Photojournalism has captured some of the most profound images of social and protest movements. RIT Press is hosting an upcoming exhibition titled "Whose Streets? Our Streets!"

It's a look at the images that tell stories from New York City during a period of tumult and change. The images focus on demonstrations regarding police brutality, queer activism, AIDS, race relations, war, the environment, and more. Our guests will discuss the power of these images.

Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the archbishop of Washington, D.C., who has been accused of covering up sexual abuse scandals during his tenure as the bishop of Pittsburgh.

The Upstate Latino Summit is coming to Rochester for 2018. The event features leaders from around the state in the Latino community; it's designed to highlight issues most pertinent to Latinos. So what are those issues?

Our guests explore them:

Julio Saenz, Poder 97.1 FM and Ibero American Action League Hilda Rosario-Escher, President and CEO of the Ibero American Action League.

Capturing the struggle for social change in America from behind the lens. On this edition of Need to Know, we hear from the photographers dedicated to documenting social issues and activism in US history as we explore how social documentary photography can further democracy.

Also on the show, renowned fashion historian and author John A. Tiffany makes the case for the impact of clothing and dress on our society just in time for Rochester Fashion Week.

Trillium Health

Rochester has a representative on a task force working on what Gov. Andrew Cuomo says is the state’s first strategy to eliminate hepatitis C.

Cuomo named Trillium Health innovation director Ashley Zuppelli to the group Thursday. Zuppelli said the task force’s work is important.

The New York state health department is recommending that people who are served by the Village of Rushville’s Public Water Supply, including customers in the Middlesex Water District, use an alternate source of water for drinking, cooking, making infant formula, making ice, and preparing food and beverages until further notice.

A trial date of Feb. 3, 2020 has beens set for the federal insider trading case involving Rep. Chris Collins.

Matt Ryan, New York Now

The Republican candidate for attorney general in New York, Keith Wofford, said if he wins, he’d go after the head of his party, President Donald Trump, and his policies — but only if there’s a good reason.

The current attorney general, Barbara Underwood, has dozens of lawsuits on file against Trump, ranging from an investigation of the Trump Foundation to the administration’s environmental policies.

The Democratic candidate for attorney general, New York City Public Advocate Tish James, has said she’d continue those actions.

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From the Inclusion Desk

Beth Adams/WXXI News

In celebration of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a local nonprofit is recognizing a long-time employee.

Young Kim is 37 years old. She's been working at Unistel Industries on Blossom Road in Rochester since 2002.

Unistel is a nonprofit that provides job training and placement for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Young and her colleagues work on assembly lines at the company, which is the country's number one supplier of spices for the U.S. military.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

You may have seen pictures of two local men go viral: a barber giving a man a haircut on the sidewalk because the shop wasn’t accessible by wheelchair.

But since the story went national, it’s raised questions about how people with disabilities are covered in the media.

Devin Hamilton is 30 years old. He's an engineer working in Webster, and he has cerebral palsy. He says one day, he decided to get a haircut at Joe's Upscale Barbershop, a few blocks from where he works. But when he rode his wheelchair over there, he didn't see a ramp.

We're joined by former Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa, who authored the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Research shows that among similarly sized cities, Rochester is the single worst in the country when it comes to employment and poverty for people with disabilities. 

Harkin is the keynote speaker for the upcoming ROC EmployABILITY conference, which is focused on increasing employment opportunities and reducing poverty among people with disabilities. We preview that conference. In studio:

INTELLIGENT LIVES

In Rochester, the graduation rate for students with disabilities is 22 percent* compared to 40 percent nationally.  The median individual earnings for those with disabilities is $14,450. This is $4,000 below the national median.  That means Rochester’s disabled community is the poorest in the nation when compared to the 75 largest metropolitan areas.

Despite the systemic challenges of educational segregation and stereotypes, adults with intellectual disabilities are challenging the perceptions of intelligence as they navigate high school, college, and the workforce.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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