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Christine Corrado

Crews work to clear several inches of snow from area highways; bulk of the snowfall is over

Several inches of snow fell overnight Thursday into early Friday morning for much of Upstate NY, including Western NY and the Finger Lakes. By Noon on Friday, most warnings and advisories had been canceled by the National Weather Service. News 8 Meteorologist Josh Nichols says it will be a sloppy commute for some drivers on Friday with snow tapering off Friday morning. The plows did get a good chance to clear up major highways and roads early Friday, but a number of side roads may still be...

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Novelist and screenwriter William Goldman, who wrote the beloved cult classic The Princess Bride and won Oscars for writing All the President's Men and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, has died at 87.

Goldman's son-in-law, Mike Pavol, tells NPR that Goldman died Friday morning in New York City.

His legend was cemented in Hollywood, but Goldman himself was an avowed New Yorker. He was born in Chicago, went to Oberlin College in Ohio, served briefly in the military and got a master's in English from Columbia University in New York.

Updated 12:13 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Washington ruled Friday in favor of CNN in a decision that represents the first legal blows between Trump and the news media.

Judge Timothy Kelly, a Trump appointee, ordered the White House to restore correspondent Jim Acosta's press credentials.

"Each day he [Acosta] is deprived ... suffers a harm that cannot be remedied in retrospect," Kelly said.

First hour: Activist Jeremy Tjhung 

Second hour: Discussing the film, "The Good Mind," and Native American land rights

Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET

The U.S. government may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to suggestions in a document filed in an unrelated case.

Assange's name appeared at least twice in papers filed in the Eastern District Court of Virginia, both times appearing to say that Assange has already been made the subject of his own case.

Prosecutors in Virginia say the court document was an error.

Christine Corrado

Several inches of  snow fell overnight Thursday into early Friday morning for much of Upstate NY, including Western NY and the Finger Lakes.

By Noon on Friday, most warnings and advisories had been canceled by the National Weather Service.

News 8 Meteorologist Josh Nichols says it will be a sloppy commute for some drivers on Friday with snow tapering off  Friday morning. The plows did get a good chance to clear up major highways and roads early Friday, but a number of side roads may still be snow-packed.

Otherwise, Friday will see brisk winds and a high of 37.

Emily Hunt / for WXXI News

Some Rochester School board members on Thursday spoke out the report issued by the state’s Distinguished Educator, Jamie Acquino.

In that review of the district’s operations which was released on Wednesday, Acquino made 84 recommendations, among them calling for the district to shift its entire focus from the interests of adults to a student-centered agenda.

School board President Van White takes issue with that characterization.

When it comes to mental health, some in our community are suffering in silence. On this edition of Need to Know we learn why it’s happening and the types of solutions that can lead to care and healing.

Also on the show, the 2016 presidential election proved campaign rhetoric is more than simply phrases used by candidates to sway voters. We’ll discuss how gender and race in that historic election influenced our current political climate and how we can change it.

As the region prepares for a wintry blast tonight, the New York state Department of Transportation says it’s ready to do its part to keep roads clear.

Spokesman Jordan Guerrein said the expected 6 inches of snow in the region is “a very manageable amount” for the department.

He said the DOT has been in touch with the National Weather Service to know what to expect — and they’ve planned accordingly.

“We have people on call, we have salt stocked, we have fuel ready to go in our trucks,” he said.

ROC the Future addresses the "State of our Children"

21 hours ago
rocthefuture.org

A group that works to improve academic achievement for Rochester's children is out with its annual report card.

ROC the Future is a public/private partnership of over 100 organizations.

Chair Ajamu Kitwana says the group's shared goals include making sure every child enters kindergarten school-ready, that they're supported through their journey through school and that they're ready for college or a career.

He says the report card shows progress in many of those measures, with positive trends in high school graduation, early grade literacy, and middle-grade math.

The Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence and the University of Rochester are hosting several speakers as part of Rochester’s inaugural International Education Week. They join us in our studio to discuss a range of issues, including barriers to education and healthcare; factors that affect women’s empowerment across the globe; and how to create more equity in leadership.

Our guests:

  • Doris Gray, Ph.D., director of the Hillary Clinton Center for Women’s Empowerment at Al Akhawayn University
  • Dr. Monica Sharma, M.D., Ph.D., author of “Radical Transformational Leadership”
  • Jane Gatewood, Ph.D., vice provost for global engagement at the University of Rochester
  • Beatriz Gil Gonzalez, student body president at the University of Rochester

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News from NPR

Novelist and screenwriter William Goldman, who wrote the beloved cult classic The Princess Bride and won Oscars for writing All the President's Men and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, has died at 87.

Goldman's son-in-law, Mike Pavol, tells NPR that Goldman died Friday morning in New York City.

His legend was cemented in Hollywood, but Goldman himself was an avowed New Yorker. He was born in Chicago, went to Oberlin College in Ohio, served briefly in the military and got a master's in English from Columbia University in New York.

Updated 12:13 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Washington ruled Friday in favor of CNN in a decision that represents the first legal blows between Trump and the news media.

Judge Timothy Kelly, a Trump appointee, ordered the White House to restore correspondent Jim Acosta's press credentials.

"Each day he [Acosta] is deprived ... suffers a harm that cannot be remedied in retrospect," Kelly said.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

More than 600 people are missing in the wake of the Northern California wildfire known as the Camp Fire, authorities say. It's a number that has ballooned rapidly and is expected to continue to fluctuate. The Butte County Sheriff's Office had said late Wednesday that 130 people were missing; on Thursday evening, the list had grown to 631.

A big car company is going small. Ford is buying electric scooter company Spin.

Ford and Spin won't confirm the price tag, but reports put the purchase price at $100 million and an overall investment from Ford of $200 million.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

Artists Unlimited has been bringing together actors with and without disabilities for plays for 18 years, and WXXI’s Caitlin Whyte has been following the cast and crew of this year’s show, “The Little Mermaid.” For the last of her three stories from WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, she talked to one of the lead stars and his family about how the program affects them.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

As Artists Unlimited, a local theater group that integrates people with and without disabilities, gets ready for its latest production of the Little Mermaid, WXXI's Caitlin Whyte stopped by another rehearsal for a unique part of the play — the fly scenes. She has been following the group as they prepare for their 18th production.

When I walk into fly rehearsal, just a week before the show debuts, the crew is discussing how to rig Ariel up for her big reveal, turning from mermaid to woman, while in the air.

It takes a second, but they figure out the scene. The fly crew is a team of dads, most with kids in the play, pulling ropes and securing harnesses to make the underwater scenes more intricate and lifelike.

Center for Disability Rights

Rochester's Center for Disability Rights has started sorting through what the organization’s systems advocate Ericka Jones called a "bumpy" Election Day.

Jones spent the day tracking problems that people with disabilities encountered at polling sites. She said complaints around specially designed voting machines called “ballot-marking devices” came up often.

New York City Board of Elections

As candidates and political parties try to get out the vote on Election Day, another group is working to make sure that once people get to their polling place, they have the tools they need to cast a ballot.

Ericka Jones tracks complaints about polling places that aren’t equipped to help people with disabilities, and tries to find solutions. Jones is the systems advocate at Rochester’s Center for Disability Rights, and she called Election Day “one of the most stressful days” of her year.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

A wide-reaching epidemic

WXXI, in partnership with public broadcasting stations across New York state, is airing special programming examining the opioid crisis.

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