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ROC the Future addresses the "State of our Children"

A group that works to improve academic achievement for Rochester's children is out with its annual report card. ROC the Future is a public/private partnership of over 100 organizations. Chair Ajamu Kitwana says the group's shared goals include making sure every child enters kindergarten school-ready, that they're supported through their journey through school and that they're ready for college or a career. He says the report card shows progress in many of those measures, with positive trends...

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When it comes to mental health, some in our community are suffering in silence. On this edition of Need to Know we learn why it’s happening and the types of solutions that can lead to care and healing.

Also on the show, the 2016 presidential election proved campaign rhetoric is more than simply phrases used by candidates to sway voters. We’ll discuss how gender and race in that historic election influenced our current political climate and how we can change it.

As the region prepares for a wintry blast tonight, the New York state Department of Transportation says it’s ready to do its part to keep roads clear.

Spokesman Jordan Guerrein said the expected 6 inches of snow in the region is “a very manageable amount” for the department.

He said the DOT has been in touch with the National Weather Service to know what to expect — and they’ve planned accordingly.

“We have people on call, we have salt stocked, we have fuel ready to go in our trucks,” he said.

www.weather.gov

Another bout of winter weather is headed our way, with heavy, wet snow coming to many places in Western and Central NY and the Finger Lakes.

The National Weather Service has issued a Winter Weather Advisory for Monroe, Orleans and Genesee counties and the Buffalo area from late Thursday afternoon into Friday morning.

ROC the Future addresses the "State of our Children"

6 hours ago
rocthefuture.org

A group that works to improve academic achievement for Rochester's children is out with its annual report card.

ROC the Future is a public/private partnership of over 100 organizations.

Chair Ajamu Kitwana says the group's shared goals include making sure every child enters kindergarten school-ready, that they're supported through their journey through school and that they're ready for college or a career.

He says the report card shows progress in many of those measures, with positive trends in high school graduation, early grade literacy, and middle-grade math.

The Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence and the University of Rochester are hosting several speakers as part of Rochester’s inaugural International Education Week. They join us in our studio to discuss a range of issues, including barriers to education and healthcare; factors that affect women’s empowerment across the globe; and how to create more equity in leadership.

Our guests:

  • Doris Gray, Ph.D., director of the Hillary Clinton Center for Women’s Empowerment at Al Akhawayn University
  • Dr. Monica Sharma, M.D., Ph.D., author of “Radical Transformational Leadership”
  • Jane Gatewood, Ph.D., vice provost for global engagement at the University of Rochester
  • Beatriz Gil Gonzalez, student body president at the University of Rochester

The terms “bubbles,” “silos,” and “echo chambers” are common in our current political dialogue, and they all relate to the broader concept of polarization. Philosopher Robert Talisse says while polarization is commonly acknowledged as detrimental to democracy, its impact stretches beyond partisan politics.

This hour, we sit down with Talisse to discuss democracy, belief systems, and what he says is a surprising remedy for political polarization. Talisse is in town as a guest of RIT, but first, he’s our guest on Connections. In studio:

  • Robert Talisse, W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University
  • Lawrence Torcello, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy at RIT

Buffalo's Bishop Richard Malone says comes away from the meeting of U.S. bishops in Baltimore "astonished, shocked and dismayed" that action was not taken on priest abuse. However, he believes the Vatican's postponement may be because of the global nature of the crisis.


It was the kind of love triangle that would test the imagination of even the most creative novelists.

In 2015, Richard Matt and David Sweat, two prison inmates, turned a sexual relationship with a female employee at the prison into their ticket to freedom. And for weeks, news coverage followed every twist and turn of their remarkable escape from Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, N.Y.

The youngest generation in the U.S. is entering adulthood as the country's most racially and ethnically diverse generation and is on its way to becoming the best educated generation yet, according to a Pew Research Center report released Thursday.

Vanderbilt University

First hour: What are the impacts and remedies for polarization?

Second hour: Discussing women's empowerment across the globe

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News from NPR

A New Jersey couple and a homeless veteran caught in an acrimonious battle over more than $400,000 in donations to a GoFundMe fundraiser have been charged with second degree felonies for allegedly fabricating the story that got them the money in the first place.

"The entire campaign was predicated on a lie," Burlington County Prosecutor Scott Coffina said at a news conference on Thursday.

The couple, Katelyn McClure and Mark D'Amico, and Johnny Bobbitt Jr. have been charged with second degree theft by deception and conspiracy to commit theft by deception, Coffina said.

A plan to repatriate Rohingya refugees to Myanmar from neighboring Bangladesh has stalled, apparently because the refugees were unwilling to go.

Bangladesh has stressed that it will not repatriate anyone against their will. Still, the program sparked protests among some refugees, while others reportedly hid within refugee camps out of fear of being forced to go back.

It sounds like a simple question for a police department. How many Native American women have gone missing or been murdered in a given city? In Seattle, say. Or Albuquerque. Or Salt Lake City. Or Baltimore.

But when researchers Abigail Echo-Hawk and Annita Lucchesi asked 71 cities across the U.S. for the answer, they found more silence and confusion than answers.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

Artists Unlimited has been bringing together actors with and without disabilities for plays for 18 years, and WXXI’s Caitlin Whyte has been following the cast and crew of this year’s show, “The Little Mermaid.” For the last of her three stories from WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, she talked to one of the lead stars and his family about how the program affects them.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

As Artists Unlimited, a local theater group that integrates people with and without disabilities, gets ready for its latest production of the Little Mermaid, WXXI's Caitlin Whyte stopped by another rehearsal for a unique part of the play — the fly scenes. She has been following the group as they prepare for their 18th production.

When I walk into fly rehearsal, just a week before the show debuts, the crew is discussing how to rig Ariel up for her big reveal, turning from mermaid to woman, while in the air.

It takes a second, but they figure out the scene. The fly crew is a team of dads, most with kids in the play, pulling ropes and securing harnesses to make the underwater scenes more intricate and lifelike.

Center for Disability Rights

Rochester's Center for Disability Rights has started sorting through what the organization’s systems advocate Ericka Jones called a "bumpy" Election Day.

Jones spent the day tracking problems that people with disabilities encountered at polling sites. She said complaints around specially designed voting machines called “ballot-marking devices” came up often.

New York City Board of Elections

As candidates and political parties try to get out the vote on Election Day, another group is working to make sure that once people get to their polling place, they have the tools they need to cast a ballot.

Ericka Jones tracks complaints about polling places that aren’t equipped to help people with disabilities, and tries to find solutions. Jones is the systems advocate at Rochester’s Center for Disability Rights, and she called Election Day “one of the most stressful days” of her year.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

A wide-reaching epidemic

WXXI, in partnership with public broadcasting stations across New York state, is airing special programming examining the opioid crisis.

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