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Kofi Annan, Former U.N. Secretary-General, Peace Prize Winner, Dies At 80

Updated at 8:36 a.m. ET Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan died Saturday, the foundation bearing his name confirmed. He was 80. "Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations, he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law," the Kofi Annan Foundation and Annan family...

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A record-breaking number of women are running for political office this year. According to some women in the political trenches, the reasons run deep. And according to some researchers and lawmakers, the impact could be long-term. It all seems quite fitting as the Centennial celebration is underway in New York for women’s suffrage. On August 23rd, leaders from around the state will gather in Rochester for Seneca Falls Revisited: A Women’s Equality Weekend. The meaning behind the event and its intended impact on this edition of Need to Know.

Between the 25 cent milk and funnel cake, Narcan training will also be available at the New York State Fair.

This is the first time the opioid reversing drug will be available at the fair, with trainings every day, provided by the state Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services.

Rob Kent is the General Council at that office, and says even though its unusual setting, New Yorkers need to be aware that “we’re in a major crisis here with opioids."

He says it’s just another way to get the lifesaving drug into the hands of more New Yorkers.

Peace amidst war in opera at Glimmerglass

Aug 18, 2018

Cooperstown, New York means one thing to baseball fans  - the Hall of Fame, And another thing to opera fans – The Glimmerglass Festival, held every summer.

One of the operas on stage this year is Silent Night – based on a true story of a legendary cease-fire during World War I.

Updated at 8:36 a.m. ET

Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan died Saturday, the foundation bearing his name confirmed. He was 80.

"Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations, he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law," the Kofi Annan Foundation and Annan family said in a statement.

Karen DeWitt

New York Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney is running in the four-way Democratic primary for state attorney general after former Attorney General Eric Schneiderman resigned in May over accusations that he physically assaulted women he dated.

It’s a short campaign season before the Sept. 13 primary. Now that Congress is in recess, the 52-year-old Maloney, who represents portions of the Hudson Valley, has stepped up his campaign schedule, with daily events across the state.

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Pope Francis calling for a worldwide abolition of the death penalty;
  • The Violence Against Women Act, and how to recognize signs of abuse;
  • LGBTQ representation in television and film;
  • The legacy of Fred Rogers.

AAA offers programs and tips to prepare young drivers

Aug 17, 2018
westerncentralny.aaa.com

With students heading back to high school and college, September will bring even more traffic on area roadways, and AAA is stressing safety when school is back in session.

The auto club is offering its License to Learn program, which provides classroom instruction, driving lessons and the necessary materials for teen drivers to take the state road test.

AAA recommends teens get plenty of practice behind the wheel and be willing to accept instruction and feedback about safe driving from adults and driver education instructors.

A recent article in the New York Times is touting creativity as a new "cure" for the midlife crisis. The Times reports that creativity has emerged as a popular antidote for boredom and a way to find meaning and purpose. Many people in their 40s and 50s are picking up their paintbrushes, learning to sing for the first time, or revisiting passions from their youth. The moves have helped these emerging or re-emerging artists combat anxiety and depression, reinvent themselves, or even breathe new life into a decades-long career.

This hour, we're joined by local artists from a variety disciplines, who share how their passions helped them find new meaning both personally and professionally. In studio: 

  • Jack Feerick, critic-at-large for popdose.com, and current lead singer for Roscoe's Basement
  • Laura Fleming, licensed clinical social worker, comedy improvisor, and quilter
  • Jack Baron, president and COO of Sweetwater Energy, and member of the band, You Don't Know Jack
  • Lorraine Fusare, dabbler in the arts

It has been almost four years since the First Fill Ceremony for the Inner Loop. Significant portions of the Inner Loop East Project have been completed, and Rochester residents are now seeing at-grade, complete streets at the old sites. Along those sites are a number of new buildings, and there are plans for more residential and retail development.

This hour, we talk about development along the former Inner Loop and what it means for our community. Our guests discuss housing, transportation, parking, and how to create more connected neighborhoods. In studio:

  • Bret Garwood, chief operating officer for Home Leasing
  • Bill Price, landscape architect, urban planner with SWBR, and president of the board of directors for the Community Design Center Rochester

Office of NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the remark he made earlier in the week that America "was never that great" was "inartful."

Cuomo made the comment while criticizing President Trump's slogan "Make America Great Again."

It prompted Trump to tweet that Cuomo was having a "total meltdown."

In a conference call with reporters Friday, Cuomo emphasized that America has always been great, but where Trump is taking this country is the antithesis of American greatness.

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News from NPR

Michael Doody remembers some things about his Columbus, Ohio neighborhood in the 1990s:

"Gunshots, helicopters, thefts, smashed out windows, burglaries, robberies, assaults and murders."

In addition to the crime, roughly 50 percent of the children were living in poverty in this area, known as Southern Orchards.

During the mid-20th century, construction of an interstate through the middle of the community separated many of the neighborhood's majority black residents from job opportunities in downtown Columbus.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson is accusing tech behemoth Facebook of engaging in housing discrimination, according to a complaint filed on Friday.

In it, HUD says the social media giant allows landlords and home sellers access to advertising tools that limit which prospective buyers or tenants can view certain online ads based on race, religion, sex, disability and other characteristics.

In August 1950, 14-year-old Ahn Seung-choon was still asleep at home early one morning when her mother woke her up, screaming that her 17-year-old brother had been taken by North Korean soldiers.

"Someone took your brother, and you are still sleeping!" Ahn recalls her mother shouting. Her mother had tried to chase the boy and his abductors, but she had babies to take care of at home and couldn't follow them for long.

"After that day, we didn't hear anything about him," Ahn says 68 years later in Suwon, a city south of the capital Seoul.

What's it like to live in Honduras today — and why do so many people want to leave?

Those are the questions that photojournalist Tomas Ayuso, who grew up in the Central American country, explores in a project he calls "The Right To Grow Old."

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

Luticha Doucette always knew she wanted to be a scientist, even if no one else thought she could do it.

"I was very much discouraged from going into the sciences. People would be like, 'Well, don’t you want to be a teacher?' And I would be like, yeah, teachers are great, but that’s not what my heart was in."

University of Rochester Medical Center

A local autism researcher is being remembered as a pioneer in the field whose work significantly changed the approach to autism spectrum disorder.

Tristram Smith died of a heart attack on Monday. He was 57.

“His brain was a national treasure,” said Susan Hyman, M.D., chief of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at URMC. “It was because of his work that families could have the hope that their children would gain skills. It really has changed how we in Rochester and nationally treat young children with autism."

Provided

Laurel Hunter spells her last name, "H-U-N-T-E-the sound a pirate makes."

She has a lisp and is the daughter of a deaf adult.

"I can’t always hear the difference between certain sounds," she says. "That means partly that I can’t hear accents and partly that I can’t say my own name!"

Schools across the country are making their classrooms more inclusive to people with disabilities by including things like appropriate desks and interpreters, but how a classroom sounds can have a big effect on who can learn in it.

Edward Steinfeld is a professor of architecture and Director for the Center of Inclusive Design and Environmental Access at the University at Buffalo.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

What's the ripple effect of the opioid crisis?

WXXI News looks at the people, places, and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis

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