WXXI AM News

Top Stories

Kofi Annan, Former U.N. Secretary-General, Peace Prize Winner, Dies At 80

Updated at 8:36 a.m. ET Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan died Saturday, the foundation bearing his name confirmed. He was 80. "Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations, he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law," the Kofi Annan Foundation and Annan family...

Read More

Peace amidst war in opera at Glimmerglass

22 hours ago

Cooperstown, New York means one thing to baseball fans  - the Hall of Fame, And another thing to opera fans – The Glimmerglass Festival, held every summer.

One of the operas on stage this year is Silent Night – based on a true story of a legendary cease-fire during World War I.

Updated at 8:36 a.m. ET

Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan died Saturday, the foundation bearing his name confirmed. He was 80.

"Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations, he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law," the Kofi Annan Foundation and Annan family said in a statement.

Karen DeWitt

New York Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney is running in the four-way Democratic primary for state attorney general after former Attorney General Eric Schneiderman resigned in May over accusations that he physically assaulted women he dated.

It’s a short campaign season before the Sept. 13 primary. Now that Congress is in recess, the 52-year-old Maloney, who represents portions of the Hudson Valley, has stepped up his campaign schedule, with daily events across the state.

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Pope Francis calling for a worldwide abolition of the death penalty;
  • The Violence Against Women Act, and how to recognize signs of abuse;
  • LGBTQ representation in television and film;
  • The legacy of Fred Rogers.

AAA offers programs and tips to prepare young drivers

Aug 17, 2018
westerncentralny.aaa.com

With students heading back to high school and college, September will bring even more traffic on area roadways, and AAA is stressing safety when school is back in session.

The auto club is offering its License to Learn program, which provides classroom instruction, driving lessons and the necessary materials for teen drivers to take the state road test.

AAA recommends teens get plenty of practice behind the wheel and be willing to accept instruction and feedback about safe driving from adults and driver education instructors.

A recent article in the New York Times is touting creativity as a new "cure" for the midlife crisis. The Times reports that creativity has emerged as a popular antidote for boredom and a way to find meaning and purpose. Many people in their 40s and 50s are picking up their paintbrushes, learning to sing for the first time, or revisiting passions from their youth. The moves have helped these emerging or re-emerging artists combat anxiety and depression, reinvent themselves, or even breathe new life into a decades-long career.

This hour, we're joined by local artists from a variety disciplines, who share how their passions helped them find new meaning both personally and professionally. In studio: 

  • Jack Feerick, critic-at-large for popdose.com, and current lead singer for Roscoe's Basement
  • Laura Fleming, licensed clinical social worker, comedy improvisor, and quilter
  • Jack Baron, president and COO of Sweetwater Energy, and member of the band, You Don't Know Jack
  • Lorraine Fusare, dabbler in the arts

It has been almost four years since the First Fill Ceremony for the Inner Loop. Significant portions of the Inner Loop East Project have been completed, and Rochester residents are now seeing at-grade, complete streets at the old sites. Along those sites are a number of new buildings, and there are plans for more residential and retail development.

This hour, we talk about development along the former Inner Loop and what it means for our community. Our guests discuss housing, transportation, parking, and how to create more connected neighborhoods. In studio:

  • Bret Garwood, chief operating officer for Home Leasing
  • Bill Price, landscape architect, urban planner with SWBR, and president of the board of directors for the Community Design Center Rochester

Office of NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the remark he made earlier in the week that America "was never that great" was "inartful."

Cuomo made the comment while criticizing President Trump's slogan "Make America Great Again."

It prompted Trump to tweet that Cuomo was having a "total meltdown."

In a conference call with reporters Friday, Cuomo emphasized that America has always been great, but where Trump is taking this country is the antithesis of American greatness.

Feeding the food insecure this summer

Aug 17, 2018
Mark Dwyer Foodlink

Foodlink, the food bank serving the 10 county region, has started it’s sixth “BackPack” program, part of the annual Fill the Bus campaign.

Communications manager Mark Dwyer says shoppers at area Wegmans can pick a food bag at the checkout line to donate to Foodlink.

And that donated food will go to children in Foodlink’s service area who are at risk of food insecurity.

Dan Shinneman / Creative Commons License

(AP) — A three-day Phish music festival was scuttled by dirty water from torrential rains on Thursday, with health officials denying a permit just as the rock band was about to go onstage for its traditional sound check jam.

"We are still in shock," the band said in a statement on its website . "Our families are here, our gear is set, our tents are up. We keep waiting for someone to come over and tell us that there is a solution, and that the festival can go on. Unfortunately, it is not possible."

Pages

News from NPR

Imran Khan was sworn in Saturday as Pakistan's new Prime Minister, ushering in a new era in the country. The legendary cricket star and international playboy turned politician was voted in with a slim majority – just 51 percent of the vote — and allegations of election meddling and voter irregularities.

In an emotional speech after the vote, Khan repeated a campaign theme of vowing to stamp out corruption. On Saturday Khan approved his cabinet, and appointed one of his top aides, Shireen Mazari, to minister designate of human rights.

Sunday marks the first day of the hajj, the annual pilgrimage of Muslims to Mecca. The journey to the holiest site in the Muslim world is one of the five pillars of Islam, and is expected to draw around 2 million people — making it among the largest yearly gatherings in the world . It lasts through Friday, Aug. 24.

Updated 1:20 p.m. ET

Families of 19 victims in the deadly bridge collapse in Genoa, Italy gathered on Saturday at a state-run funeral.

At least 38 people died when a section of Morandi Bridge collapsed in the Italian port city just before noon on Tuesday, sending cars and trucks tumbling to highway A10 below.

An elite boarding school in Connecticut is acknowledging sexual abuse by seven now-former staffers against 16 students — going back as far as 1969 and lasting until 1992.

The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn., is a private high school of about 600 students.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

Luticha Doucette always knew she wanted to be a scientist, even if no one else thought she could do it.

"I was very much discouraged from going into the sciences. People would be like, 'Well, don’t you want to be a teacher?' And I would be like, yeah, teachers are great, but that’s not what my heart was in."

University of Rochester Medical Center

A local autism researcher is being remembered as a pioneer in the field whose work significantly changed the approach to autism spectrum disorder.

Tristram Smith died of a heart attack on Monday. He was 57.

“His brain was a national treasure,” said Susan Hyman, M.D., chief of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at URMC. “It was because of his work that families could have the hope that their children would gain skills. It really has changed how we in Rochester and nationally treat young children with autism."

Provided

Laurel Hunter spells her last name, "H-U-N-T-E-the sound a pirate makes."

She has a lisp and is the daughter of a deaf adult.

"I can’t always hear the difference between certain sounds," she says. "That means partly that I can’t hear accents and partly that I can’t say my own name!"

Schools across the country are making their classrooms more inclusive to people with disabilities by including things like appropriate desks and interpreters, but how a classroom sounds can have a big effect on who can learn in it.

Edward Steinfeld is a professor of architecture and Director for the Center of Inclusive Design and Environmental Access at the University at Buffalo.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

What's the ripple effect of the opioid crisis?

WXXI News looks at the people, places, and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis

Meet the WXXI News Team

The reporters you hear everyday