WXXI AM News

learning

What can the U.S. education system learn from Finland? Perhaps the better question is, do students need school subjects? Teachers in Finland are gearing up for a significant shift in curricula for high school students. In 2020, curricula for students aged 16 and older will be rooted in phenomenon-based learning. That means instead of students taking math class, then science class, then English class, they will choose an event or phenomenon to study, incorporating multiple subjects in the process (something like exploring the climates of different countries, and reporting on them in French).

The model is getting some pushback, with critics saying it may lower standards and widen the gap between students who grasp concepts more quickly and those who need more direction. Could such a model be adopted in the U.S.?

Our guests weigh in on different forms of learning and the future of education. In studio:

  • Evvy Fanning, local high school English teacher
  • Douglas Allard, 7th grade social studies teacher in the Phelps Clifton Springs School District
  • Jennifer Wagner, RCSD educator and parent
  • Joanne Larson, professor of education and associate director of research at the Center for Urban Education Success at the University of Rochester's Warner School of Education

What does the increasing emphasis on testing do to our pre-schoolers?

Erika Christakis is the author of The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups. Her book is an examination of how we expect kids to learn, and why we tend to de-emphasize play and creativity. We talk about the consequences and the changes she would prefer. Our guests:

This hour we take a look at the growth of the local knowledge industry. We have the founders of the Rochester Brainery, Stephanie Rankin and Danielle Raymo to discuss what you can learn, and we talk with the following instructors who teach at the Rochester Brainery:

  • Tony Esteves
  • Megan Mack, 
  • Rachel Gootnick