WXXI AM News

Police

The Irondequoit Police Department will be hosting its Police Community Relations Forum next week. The goal is to build community engagement and identify a two-year strategic plan for the police department using resident input. The forum is one of several hosted by the Greater Rochester Police Community Relations working group over the last two years.

This hour, we preview the Irondequoit forum and discuss 21st century policing. Our guests:

  • Chief Richard Tantalo, Irondequoit Police Department
  • Andrae Evans, member of the planning committee for the Irondequoit Police Community Relations Forum 
  • Rev. Patrina Freeman, member of the planning committee for the Irondequoit Police Community Relations Forum
  • David Seeley, Irondequoit Town Supervisor

We sit down with Frank Liberti and Cheryl Hayward from the Center for Dispute Settlement, focusing on police accountability in Rochester. The CDS currently evaluates cases that stem from civilian complaints. A recent report from local activists alleges that the system is broken, and that civilian complaints are almost never sustained. CDS disagrees; however, CDS has made its own recommendations for how to improve the system. Our guests explain:

  • Frank Liberti, president and CEO of the Center for Dispute Settlement
  • Cheryl Hayward, director of the Police and Community Relations Program at the Center for Dispute Settlement

A new report takes a look at how police accountability works or doesn't work in Rochester. The report is called "The Case for an Independent Police Accountability System." It was written by Barbara Lacker-Ware and Theodore Forsyth. 

The report looks at years of data regarding how police handle civilian complaints regarding allegations of brutality and misconduct. The report found that from 2002 to 2015, only two percent of civilian complaints of unnecessary force were sustained by the Chief of Police, and only five percent were sustained by the Civilian Review Board.

Lacker-Ware and Forsyth say there is a breakdown in the system, but critics say their report pushes too hard, and misunderstandings need to be addressed.

Lacker-Ware and Forsyth join us in studio to break down the report and its recommendations.

In many ways, police work is more under the microscope than it has ever been. There are cameras everywhere. Citizens capture almost everything on cell phone video. Many officers welcome that; but still others say that it makes doing their jobs occasionally difficult, feeling that a single incident can be captured, without context, and cost a career.

We sit down with Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli to discuss how his officers feel about the scrutiny, and how to continue building a strong relationship with the local community. Our guests:

  • Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli
  • Rochester Police Captain Kevin Costello
  • Rochester Police Investigator Jackie Shuman

First hour: Police work in the age of cell phone cameras

Second hour: Upstate Revitalization Initiative

In many ways, police work is more under the microscope than it has ever been. There are cameras everywhere. Citizens capture almost everything on cell phone video. Many officers welcome that; but still others say that it makes doing their jobs occasionally difficult, feeling that a single incident can be captured, without context, and cost a career.

In our first hour, we'll sit down with Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli to discuss how his officers feel about the scrutiny, and how to continue building a strong relationship with the local community. Our guests:

  • Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli
  • Rochester Police Captain Kevin Costello
  • Rochester Police Investigator Jackie Shuman

In our second hour, the Rochester/Finger Lakes region was one of three regions to win the state's big economic development prize money. That means a total of $500 million is coming from the state, to be used in various ways. How, exactly, will it be spent? How should it be spent? What kinds of impacts should we look forward to? In studio, to answer those questions and more:

  • Joseph Morelle, New York State Assembly Majority Leader
  • Vincent Esposito, Empire State Development Finger Lakes Regional Director
  • Mark Peterson, Greater Rochester Enterprise President and CEO

COOPERSTOWN (AP) Police in Cooperstown are urging addicts to bring their drugs and drug paraphernalia to the police station in exchange for treatment, not arrest.

Police Chief Mike Covert announced the new policy on Facebook. He says it will go into effect on Thanksgiving.  
 Covert says addicts will each be assigned an "angel'' to guide them through recovery.

He says a local hospital is promising that drug users who come forward will be able to receive treatment promptly.

RPD Says Viral Video Doesn't Tell the Whole Story

Oct 29, 2015
Michelle Faust

Rochester Police say they’re investigating an incident that resulted in a 15-second viral video of 5 officers taking down a man in the middle of Main Street. RPD’s initial findings are that the officers’ actions were in line with their training.

Rochester Police Chief Mike Ciminelli says every use of force by an officer is reviewed and this case is still being looked at.

According to the department’s initial analysis, the man subdued by police on Tuesday behaved in a violent and threatening manner.

We look at the difficult decisions that law enforcement must make in complex cases, from the recent prison escape to dealing with homegrown terrorism connected to ISIS. Our guests have extensive experience and can offer insight into the decision-making processes. In studio:

  • Mark Concordia, Director of the Criminal Justice Administration Program at Roberts Wesleyan College; spent 13 years with the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force
  • William Hochul, United States Attorney for the Western District of New York

A police officer in South Carolina is charged with murder after video shows him shooting an unarmed black man in the back. What now? How did we get here?

The Young Democrats of Monroe County are holding a Community Policing Forum on Monday. The purpose of the event is to highlight the initiatives the Rochester Police Department has implemented under the Warren administration (reorganization, Clergy on Patrol, etc) but also allow the community to directly ask questions to those leaders. Will the reorganization work? Has the RPD taken the right steps to build a strong relationship with local neighborhoods? We ask our guests:

  • Chief Michael Ciminelli, Rochester Police Department 
  • Captain Lloyd Cuyler, RPD Goodman Section
  • Cynthia Herriott-Sullivan, CEO, Rise Up Rochester
  • Gary Pudup, retired sheriff's deputy and former Genesee Valley ACLU executive director, 
  • Tom Morissey, Monroe County Young Democrats communications chair 

We take a dive into the Department of Justice's report on policing and court practices in Ferguson, Missouri. Our panel will give us some insight:

  • Marvin McMickle, president of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School
  • Marvin Stepherson, retired Rochester police officer and a professor at Roberts Wesleyan College who helped develop a curriculum for an Ethic and Social Diversity course at RWC in the Criminal Justice Administration program.
  • Mark Concordia, director of the Criminal Justice Administration Program at Roberts Wesleyan College. 

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