WXXI AM News

Tom Dinki

Tom Dinki joined WBFO in August 2019 to cover issues affecting older adults.

Tom is a Buffalo native and 2016 University at Buffalo graduate, holding a B.A. in English and journalism certificate. While at UB, he served as editor in chief of the university's independent student newspaper, The Spectrum.

After graduating from UB, Tom spent three years as a reporter for the Olean Times Herald, where he covered mostly crime and education throughout Cattaraugus and Allegany counties.

His three-part education series, "The state of New York rural schools: Left behind," won a 2018 New York Associated Press first-place Enterprise Reporting Award, second-place Investigative and Watchdog Reporting Award, and first-place Data Visualization Award.

When he’s not eating, sleeping and breathing the news, Tom likes to ride his bike and watch — and more importantly, discuss and debate — movies and television.

You can follow him on Twitter, @tomdinki.

Calls are growing for Gov. Andrew Cuomo to resign in light of allegations of sexual harassment and a cover-up of nursing home deaths. Now New York Republicans are preparing for that possibility and trying to put the microscope on the person who would succeed Cuomo: the lieutenant governor and Buffalo native Kathy Hochul.


WBFO/Southern Administrative Services

The Green House Project, a national network of small nursing homes, have received plenty of attention for their low rates of COVID-19 during the pandemic. A University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study recently called it a “promising model” for the reinvention of nursing homes in a post-pandemic world.

But just how replicable is it? Providers and advocates say there’s still plenty of financial hurdles to cross before more nursing homes look like Green House homes. 

Beth Adams / WXXI News

(This is the first in a two-part series examining the Green House Project as a potential solution to the long-term care crisis. A second part, focused on whether the model is financially replicable, is available here.)

Like anyone with a parent in a nursing home, the pandemic hasn’t been easy for Mare Millow.

Republican Congressman Chris Jacobs, who won a special election for New York’s 27th Congressional District less than five months ago, declared he had won a full term Tuesday night, saying he was confident absentee ballots would not change the outcome of the race.


New York state nursing homes were permitted to reopen for visitation in July, and since then, many have limited visits to outdoors, keeping families on lawns and patios while taking advantage of the warm summer and early fall weather. 

 

But now, in mid-October, many question what will happen as the temperature drops.

 


Gov. Andrew Cuomo will meet with President Donald Trump Thursday to discuss their feud over the Green Light Law and the Trusted Traveler Program (TTP).  


Chris Collins will learn his fate Friday afternoon in a Manhattan courtroom. 

 

Perhaps no one but U.S. District Court Judge Vernon Broderick knows what Collins’ sentence will be, but hundreds of pages of court documents filed over the last week and a half may provide some insight.

 


A family man who had a momentary lapse of judgment. A businessman who used public office to increase his personal wealth.

 

The approximately 170 letters filed in U.S. District Court this week paint very different pictures of disgraced former Congressman Chis Collins. 


 

Anyone who’s ever watched television has probably heard this: Ask your doctor if taking this medication is right for you.

The University at Buffalo wants older adults to start asking their doctors if stopping certain medications is right for them.

 


Firm, greasy-looking smears. Dark spots with fuzzy white spores. 

 

Farmers should be on the lookout for these warning signs after late blight — the plant disease best known for causing the Irish Potato Famine — was detected on crops in Cattaraugus, Allegany and Genesee counties over the last week.