WXXI AM News

Dustin Jones

Dustin Jones is a reporter for NPR's digital news desk. He mainly covers breaking news, but enjoys working on long-form narrative pieces.

Jones got his start at NPR in September 2020 as the organization's first intern through a partnership with Military Veterans in Journalism. He interned as a producer for All Things Considered on the weekends, and then as a reporter for the Newsdesk.

He kickstarted his journalism career as a local reporter in Southwest Montana, just outside of Yellowstone National Park. From there he went on to study at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism where he focused on documentary production and book publication.

Jones served four years in the Marine Corps with tours to Iraq and Afghanistan. The New Hampshire native has lived all over the country, but currently resides in Southern California.

When Jones isn't writing for NPR, he is reporting for his local newspaper and freelancing as a video producer for the Military Times. Outside of work, he enjoys surfing, snowboarding and tearing up the dancefloor, sometimes all in the same day.

Updated June 13, 2021 at 9:16 PM ET

For the first time in more than a decade, Israel has welcomed a new prime minister. Naftali Bennett was sworn in on Sunday after a new coalition unseated longtime Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu.

The newly elected prime minister was appointed by the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in a 60-59 vote, with one minister abstaining.

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak met with members of the Nevada Indian Commission in Carson City on Friday as he signed legislation removing racially discriminatory identifiers or language from schools. Additionally, counties can no longer sound "sundown sirens," which once signified it was time for certain people to leave town.

The law will require schools to change any name, logo, mascot, song or identifier that is "racially discriminatory" or "associated with the Confederate States of America or a federally recognized Indian tribe."

The Pentagon confirmed Friday it will not allow rainbow pride flags to fly at military facilities in celebration of Pride Month. That fell in line with the Pentagon's 2020 decision to permit only certain flags at Department of Defense installations.

Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby told reporters the DOD chose not to make an exception to the existing flag policy after careful consideration.

The California Public Utilities Commission announced Friday that Cruise, a self-driving car service out of San Francisco, has been authorized to participate in the state's first pilot program to provide driverless ride services to the public.

The company is not allowed to charge passengers for rides.

Eight companies have permits for testing driverless vehicles in California, but Cruise is the only company approved for giving rides to passengers without a safety driver on board. However, the vehicles still have to have a link to a remote safety operator.

With the COVID-19 pandemic apparently coming to a close, many Americans are preparing for a no-holds-barred summer filled with many activities that the coronavirus has outlawed for more than a year. Here are some tips from the National Park Service to help visitors make the most their trip.

Plan Your Visit

Brazilian auto racer Helio Castroneves made history after winning his fourth Indianapolis 500 race on Sunday. He is now one of four drivers to win "The Greatest Spectacle in Racing" four times.

Castroneves, who took the checkered flag in 2001, 2002 and 2009, held off runner-up racer Alex Palou, winning by a mere .4928 of a second. Castroneves claimed his first three wins with Team Penske, but Sunday's win was the first Indy 500 win for Meyer Shank Racing.

President Biden visited the Delaware Memorial Bridge in New Castle Sunday where he spoke in observance of Memorial Day. The annual memorial service, hosted by the Delaware Commission of Veterans Affairs, is frequently attended by Biden.

Memorial Day, observed on the last Monday of May, commemorates people who died in U.S. military service.

Ralph "AK" Angkiangco enlisted in the Navy in April 2008 one year after graduating high school. He was an 18-year-old kid uncertain about what he wanted in life, apart from fleeing his parent's place in San Diego. He had initially considered joining the Marine Corps, but with America's Global War on Terror in full swing, his father persuaded him to become a hospital corpsman in the Navy instead.

An Alabama man is suing a Jefferson County sheriff's deputy for excessive force and civil rights violations, alleging that handcuffs he says were secured too tightly resulted in the amputation of his left hand.

A transit worker opened fire early Wednesday morning at a light-rail facility in downtown San Jose, Calif., fatally shooting nine people and taking his own life. San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo told NPR's Morning Edition that the gunman set fire to his own home before the shooting.

Pages