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Danielle Kurtzleben

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast. She is covering the 2020 presidential election, with particular focuses on on economic policy and gender politics.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in global communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Forty years ago today, protesters seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, launching a hostage crisis that went on and on.

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JIMMY CARTER: We continue to face a grave situation in Iran, where our embassy has been seized. And more than 60 American citizens continue to be held as hostages in an attempt to force unacceptable demands on our country.

KELLY: Then-President Jimmy Carter speaking about the ordeal that ended only after 444 days.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren says paying for "Medicare for All" would require $20.5 trillion in new federal spending over a decade. That spending includes higher taxes on the wealthy but no new taxes on the middle class.

The Democratic presidential candidate released her plan to pay for Medicare for All on Friday after being dogged for months by questions of how she would finance such a sweeping overhaul of the health care system. That pressure has been intensified by the fact that Warren has made detailed proposals a central part of her brand as a candidate.

Updated at 11:10 a.m. ET

Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she can fund "Medicare for All" without raising taxes on the middle class. Instead, among other things, she would boost the wealth tax on the ultra-rich that she has promoted on the campaign trail.

Bernie Sanders doesn't plan on releasing a detailed plan of how to finance his single-payer Medicare for All plan, he told CNBC's John Harwood on Tuesday.

"You're asking me to come up with an exact detailed plan of how every American — how much you're going to pay more in taxes, how much I'm going to pay," he said. "I don't think I have to do that right now."

NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben talks about whether automation and robots, or bad trade policies pose a bigger threat to jobs in America.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Are robots stealing workers' jobs? At last week's Democratic presidential debate, CNN moderator Erin Burnett dove into the thorny issue.

"According to a recent study, about a quarter of American jobs could be lost to automation in just the next 10 years," she said, asking candidates how they would respond to this problem.

After a long, steady rise in the polls, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is now vying for front-runner status with former Vice President Joe Biden. On Tuesday night, more moderate candidates took aim at her progressive policy positions as unrealistic and expensive.

"Medicare for All" — the single-payer health care plan supported by both Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — was the main topic in this moderate-progressive fight.

Trade is a signature policy area for President Trump, and one where he has been able to take dramatic action. Trump's protectionist policies appealed to voters in the industrial Midwest, the region that was critical to his 2016 victory. Now, Democratic presidential candidates are campaigning in the shadow of Trump's tariffs, subsequent trade wars, and pursuit of a replacement for NAFTA.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DANIELLE KURTZLEBEN, BYLINE: Even before Biden arrived in New Hampshire, voters here may have already heard him attacking Trump. Here is Biden in a new ad released last week intended to run in early states.

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