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Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a political correspondent covering the 2020 presidential campaign.

Before joining NPR's political team, Asma helped launch a new team for Boston's NPR station WBUR where she reported on biz/tech and the Future of Work.

She's reported on a range of stories over the years — including the 2016 presidential campaign, the Boston Marathon bombings and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Asma got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but was introduced to radio through an internship at BBC Newshour in London during grad school.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Former Vice President Joe Biden is walking back some comments he made this morning about African Americans considering reelecting President Trump.

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If you're a supporter of President Trump, longing for the excitement and MAGA-kinship of a big rally, Trump's campaign has built the next best thing. It's a massive digital operation that creates an interactive world where Trump is flawless and Republicans are saviors, while Democrats and Joe Biden are wrong and dangerous.

They encourage supporters to "forget the mainstream media" and get their "facts straight from the source," an insular information ecosystem featuring prime time programming, accessed in its most pure form through the new Trump 2020 app.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The Democratic National Committee is taking steps to prepare for a possible remote convention this summer, with a resolution being introduced to allow for changes to official proceedings given public health concerns.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, convention planners are exploring a range of contingencies for the August event in Milwaukee where Joe Biden is expected to be officially nominated as the Democratic Party's candidate for president.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

At a town hall in New Hampshire this past February, long before Joe Biden was the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, he outlined two basic criteria for his potential running mate:

"One, that they are younger than I am," the 77-year-old candidate told the crowd. "No, I'm not being facetious, and No. 2, that they are ready on Day 1 to be president of the United States of America."

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Joe Biden has started his search for a running mate. He's pledged to pick a woman, but there is still a lot to consider. NPR's Asma Khalid explains some of the calculations.

The secretary of the Senate's office said on Monday that it cannot comply with former Vice President Joe Biden's request to search for and release any records of an alleged sexual harassment complaint from Tara Reade.

On Friday, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee had formally written to Secretary of the Senate Julie Adams asking for help in determining whether Reade had filed a written complaint 27 years ago, as she says she did while working as a staff assistant in Biden's Senate office.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Yesterday, Joe Biden strongly denied allegations of sexual assault from a former staffer. But he also had to square his denial with an idea he supported in the era of #MeToo - to believe women.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

It's been more than a month now since a former Senate staffer of Joe Biden accused the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee of sexually assaulting her back in 1993. Today, Biden responded personally for the first time. He spoke to MSNBC.

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