WXXI AM News

police reform

Divided City Council passes police reform plan

17 hours ago
Max Schulte/WXXI News file photo

Two days before the deadline, Rochester City Council has passed its state-mandated police reform plan.

The grand jury’s decision not to indict the police officers involved in death of Daniel Prude has sparked outrage, emotion, and conversation throughout the community. During her press conference on Tuesday, Attorney General Letitia James shared her recommendations for police reform.

This hour, we discuss the results of the grand jury’s investigation, the reaction, and what our guests would like to see in terms of police reform. Our guests: 

  • Natalie Ann Knott, assistant public defender 
  • Danielle Ponder, attorney and musician

cityofrochester.gov

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren, the Police Accountability Board and others are presenting a draft of police reform ideas on Thursday in response to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s executive order requiring local governments to have reform plans in place by April.

The Rochester Police Department, United Christian Leadership Ministry, and the Racial and Structural Equity Commission are involved in drafting the reform proposal alongside Warren, the PAB, and City Council members.

The United Christian Leadership Ministry has announced its proposals related to changes to policing in Monroe County. The proposals come in response to Governor Cuomo’s executive order on police reform. UCLM’s recommendations include a citizen review panel, additional training for officers, and racial justice education.

We discuss the proposals with our guests:

Max Schulte | WXXI News

 

The City of Rochester unveiled a survey on police reform Monday, but some residents argue that the way that questions are worded is problematic.

  

City councilmember Mary Lupien said around 20 people have reached out to her with concerns over the wording of the survey within the first 24 hours of it’s release. 

The death of Daniel Prude has led to questions about how police are trained to handle a variety of situations. Marvin Stepherson retired as a police sergeant with 25 years of service in local law enforcement. He now teaches at Roberts Wesleyan, and comments regularly on police-community relations.

Stepherson talks about how he sees the Prude case and what kind of change is possible within police structures. Our guest:

  • Marvin Stepherson, professor of criminal justice at Roberts Wesleyan College, and retired police sergeant 

Provided

Since a video of the arrest of Daniel Prude was released two weeks ago, calls for police reform have grown louder and more insistent.

Prude died a week after he suffocated when pinned to the pavement by Rochester police officers, who had been called to check on his mental health.

Citizens, activists, and elected leaders are pointing to a program in Oregon as an example of how a community should respond to these kinds of calls.

We continue our conversation issues surrounding Daniel Prude, who died , We welcome members of the Rochester Police Accountability Board to discuss policing in Rochester and possible reforms. We're also joined by Rochester CITY Newspaper reporter Gino Fanelli, who discusses his recent piece examining 50 years of police reform in Rochester.

Our guests:

  • Shani Wilson, chair of the Rochester Police Accountability Board
  • Danielle Tucker, member of the Rochester Police Accountability Board
  • Drorah Setel, member of the Rochester Police Accountability Board
  • Gino Fanelli, reporter for Rochester CITY Newspaper

The death of Daniel Prude in Rochester police custody has sparked local demonstrations and outreach across the country. Connections is devoting both hours to this story. In our first hour, we hear from community leaders who have been calling for various reforms. They respond to the mayor's claims that she had to keep this case quiet, along with her claims that Rochester does not have the problems that other cities have when it comes to policing. We also discuss other possible reforms.

Our guests:

James Brown / WXXI News

The New York Sheriffs' Association wants to beef up penalties for people who commit crimes against law enforcement.

Executive Director Peter Kehoe said crimes against officers, like stalking and assault, have been on the rise in recent years. 

He also said doxxing, or revealing personal information about officers, is also increasing. 

Pages