WXXI AM News

Lake Ontario

Office of NY Gov. Cuomo

OSWEGO, N.Y. (AP & WXXI News)  New York state says it has deployed more than 800,000 sandbags, hundreds of pumps and 920 feet (280 meters) of temporary dams in eight counties along Lake Ontario in preparation for potential flooding.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday that officials are concerned that more rain, or high winds, could cause damage. The Democrat spoke in Oswego after viewing the nearby lakefront from a state police boat.

Office of NY Gov. Cuomo

Governor Andrew Cuomo toured a portion of the Lake Ontario shoreline on Saturday morning, stopping by to check on potential flooding and talk about the situation with local and state officials.

He said that the NYS Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services has deployed 70,000 sandbags and two six-inch pumps directly to Monroe County. 

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

Around Sodus Point you can already see the effects of high water levels. Take Arney’s Marina on the bay -- their service dock is underwater, and a pump runs constantly to keep water out of the building.

Mayor Dave McDowell says they filled hundreds of sandbags Wednesday and are going to start setting them up around the village next week. He's also declaring a state of emergency this week in order to set up equipment like pumps and hoses throughout town.

Hoping to avoid a repeat of the flooding which caused extensive property damage and forced an economically important beach to close two years ago, Governor Andrew Cuomo joined state and local officials in Niagara County Wednesday morning to discuss the strategy for holding back the rising waters of Lake Ontario.


Roger Pawlowski / www.shipwreckworld.com

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP)  Three western New York-based shipwreck hunters who have discovered some of the most significant historic wrecks in the Great Lakes have written a book about their explorations. 

``Shipwrecks of Lake Ontario: A Journey of Discovery'' was written by Jim Kennard, of Fairport, Roland Stevens, of Pultneyville, and Roger Pawlowski, of Rochester. 

Office of NY Governor Cuomo

Governor Andrew Cuomo says that state agencies are offering additional resources to help protect communities along the Lake Ontario shoreline. He made the comment during a news conference in Sodus Point on Monday afternoon

With the lake about a foot above historic levels, Cuomo noted it’s hard to say just what should be an average level for the lake in recent years.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

With concerns about rising levels on Lake Ontario, Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Sunday that he has directed state agencies to begin deploying resources to protect communities along the lakeshore.

He notes that following severe flooding in Canada, the International Joint Commission has continued to reduce outflows of water from the Moses-Saunders Dam on the St. Lawrence River in an effort to minimize impacts, and the lake's water level currently sits at more than one foot above average.

International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board/Facebook

People who live along the Lake Ontario shoreline in the Rochester area are nervously watching lake levels.

The level of Lake Ontario currently is about a foot above its long term historic average, and while high, it’s not all that unusual.

That’s according to Bryce Carmichael, he is the U.S. Secretary of the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board which helps manage lake levels.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

The south shore of Lake Ontario might become a national marine sanctuary.

Ellen Brody is the Great Lakes regional coordinator for NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.

"In many ways," she said via phone, "sanctuaries are like national parks in that our mission is to protect a resource."

She said this effort was spearheaded by the counties along the shore of Lake Ontario, which pushed for recognition and protection of the lake’s shipwrecks.

There are 13 other marine sanctuaries in the U.S. – but only one in the Great Lakes.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

In a changing climate, people living on Lake Ontario may be more at risk for flooding and extreme weather, so what compels them to stay?

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