WXXI AM News

Payne Horning

Payne Horning is a reporter and producer, primarily focusing on the city of Oswego and Oswego County. He has a passion for covering local politics and how it impacts the lives of everyday citizens. Originally from Iowa, Horning moved to Muncie, Indiana to study journalism, telecommunications and political science at Ball State University. While there, he worked as a reporter and substitute host at Indiana Public Radio. He also covered the 2015 session of the Indiana General Assembly for the statewide Indiana Public Broadcasting network.

The international body that helps regulate water levels on Lake Ontario and in the St. Lawrence River is forecasting a return to flood-level heights this summer.

Officials released a record amount of water from Lake Ontario through the Moses Saunders Dam last month and into the beginning of February. The issue is there's also a record amount of water flowing into Lake Ontario from the Great Lakes system.

With unprecedented flooding along the shoreline of Lake Ontario in two of the last three years, many communities have been reeling on how to respond and how to prepare for the next round. Enter the Great Lakes Coastal Resilience Index. It's a free self-assessment guide for communities to understand how prepared they are for coastal flooding and other weather events such as ice storms.

The U.S. and Canadian governments plan to undertake a study to assess Plan 2014, the water management plan used to help regulate the water levels in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

Syracuse University is still on edge from a string of racist and anti-Semitic incidents on campus in the last month. As students returned this week from Thanksgiving Break, they gathered with faculty and administrators Wednesday for a community peace vigil.

The amount of water that officials on the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board are releasing from Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River continues to be above the usual outflows for this time of year. That's due to the fact that lake levels are still over the so-called trigger levels in the government's water management, called Plan 2014. When those levels are exceeded, the Board can deviate from the Plan, allowing for more water to be pushed into the river.

This week, Oswego celebrated the small but significant role the city played during World War II. It was the only place in America to serve as a camp for mostly Jewish European refugees during the Holocaust. Many say the legacy of this story is the lesson it can teach, one that's still very relevant today. 

PAYNE HORNING / WRVO NEWS (FILE PHOTO)

Monday is the 75th anniversary of when 982 mostly Jewish European refugees arrived in Oswego. President Franklin D. Roosevelt brought them to the decommissioned Fort Ontario in 1944, where they lived for nearly two years to escape war-torn Europe.

To commemorate this historical moment, the city is hosting a celebration Monday that may be the last of its kind.

A coalition of New York property owners plans to sue the International Joint Commission (IJC), the international body that regulates water levels on Lake Ontario.

At the first meeting of the newly formed Lake Ontario Landowners Association, a crowd of more than 100 packed into a restaurant in Pulaski and cheered on the founder Jim Shea as he railed against the IJC and its board members.

All week long, New Yorkers have been weighing in on a proposed project that would help preserve some of the oldest shipwrecks in the Great Lakes. The federal government is considering creating a 1,700-square-mile national marine sanctuary in the southeastern portion of Lake Ontario. And as part of the designation process, federal officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spent time visiting the communities that stand to be impacted by the transformative project.

A ruling from a New York appellate court has effectively cleared the way for farm workers to organize and bargain collectively.

Pages