WXXI AM News

Climate Change

Can American free enterprise solve climate change? It's a question that will be addressed in an upcoming forum with former Republican Congressman Bob Inglis. He’ll be in Rochester on Wednesday as a guest of the Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce and the Rochester Regional Group of the Sierra Club.

Inglis joins our panel to discuss possible climate policies, a carbon tax, and more. Our guests:

Rochester native Mary DeMocker fell in love with nature as a young child, and now, she’s an author and climate activist. In her new book, “The Parents’ Guide to Climate Revolution,” she offers guidance and tips for families as they attempt to curb climate change.

DeMocker is in Rochester for a series of events. She joins us in studio for the hour to discuss her work.

In recent weeks, we've heard from a number of listeners who say they are changing their personal habits in an effort to help combat climate change. Many of those habits relate to garbage -- both at home, and at work or school.

This hour, we discuss what we collect as garbage, what we throw away, what we recycle, and what we try to reuse. Our guests share their ideas for how to reduce the amount of trash heading to landfills. In studio:

Students from more than 100 countries are holding strikes, protests, and climate-change related events today as part of “Fridays for Future,” a movement that demands world leaders take action on global warming. The movement was initiated by Greta Thunberg, a Swedish teenager who has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Students in the Rochester and Finger Lakes area are participating the in the events. We sit down with some of them to hear their priorities for climate action. In studio:

  • Liam Smith, student at Brighton High School
  • Hridesh Singh, student at Brighton High School and member of the Rochester People’s Climate Coalition
  • Thomas Neumaier, student at the Harley School
  • Tess Begley, student at the Harley School

We continue our series of conversations about statewide efforts to curb climate change. We be joined by Sandra Steingraber, a scientist, climate activist, and scholar at Ithaca College, who recently took her cause and research to Albany.

She’ll be in Rochester this weekend for a program about environmental stewardship with Interfaith Impact of New York State, but first, she joins us on Connections. Our guests:

  • Sandra Steingraber, environmental activist, biologist, and distinguished scholar in residence in the Department of Environmental Studies at Ithaca College
  • Rev. Richard Gilbert, minister emeritus of First Unitarian Church of Rochester, and president of Interfaith Impact of New York State
  • Rev. David Inglis, retired United Church of Christ pastor

There is a discouraging new study about how humans are dealing with climate change. In short, we're getting used to it. And that's dangerous. The study finds that extreme weather can feel "normal" after only a few years, and that normalization could spark apathy regarding climate action. If a past generation thought something was extreme, what happens when the current generation shrugs?

Our panel discusses the implications of this study, and how climate activists plan to push back against normalization. Our guests:

The Green New Deal is getting most of the attention when it comes to legislative ideas for combating climate change. But individual states are working on their own approaches.

New York State is working on a number of policy plans and initiatives, and our guests offer their perspective on what is proposed, what might work, and why. In studio:

  • Sue Hughes-Smith, member of the leadership team for the Rochester People's Climate Coalition
  • Heather Dulisse, Greater Rochester parent leader, and team coordinator for Irondequoit Mothers Out Front
  • Aaron Micheau, president of the Metro Justice Council
  • Andrew Thomas, member of the Rochester chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America's Ecosocialist Working Group, and fundraising and membership director at Metro Justice
  • Mark Dunlea, chair of the Green Education and Legal Fund and one of the initial authors of the Green New Deal

Democrats in Congress have introduced what they call the Green New Deal. It’s already under fire from not only the political right, but also among some members of the Democratic Party. Does the Green New Deal have any chance of passage? What would it mean in terms of policy?

Our guests help us understand what the Green New Deal is and the possible impact it could have on policy, the economy, and the environment. Our guests:

When it comes to fighting climate change, there tends to be two schools of thought. One says that it’s all about personal responsibility, and acting every day in a way that is sustainable. The other says it’s mostly about policy, especially on the federal level.

Our guests believe the two camps are related, and they try to live every hour in a way that is sensitive to our changing climate. So what does that look like? What changes might they inspire in others? Our guests:

  • Enid Cardinal, senior sustainability advisor to the president at RIT
  • Kimie Romeo, activist and recent environmental sustainability award winner

Is your home energy efficient? The goal of the Sustainable Homes Rochester campaign is to encourage community members to install clean heating and cooling systems to improve energy efficiency. What does that look like?

Our guests discuss the different technologies, how they work, and how homeowners can decide what might be the right fit for their energy goals. In studio:

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