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Women's Rights

National Women's Hall of Fame

The National Women’s Hall of Fame has announced the 9 women who will be inducted this fall, and among them is Michelle Obama.    

It’s not known yet if  the former First Lady will be at the October 2 event in Seneca Falls in-person, or virtually.

Brad VanDusen

Plans have been underway for years to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which recognized women's right to vote.

The celebration was planned for this summer in the Rochester-Finger Lakes region with parades and flotillas, speeches and gatherings scheduled. But, the COVID-19 pandemic put a stop to many of the festivities.

Throughout all this, the National Women's Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls was still determined to open its new headquarters at the historic Seneca Knitting Mill on Canal Street.

The Susan B. Anthony Museum and House rejected President Trump's pardon of Susan B. Anthony last week. Trump pardoned Anthony last Tuesday on the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment. Anthony was arrested in 1872 for voting before it was legal for women to do so. Some historians say Anthony would not have wanted to be pardoned because she didn't think she did anything wrong.

This hour, we discuss Anthony's legacy, the suffragist movement, and the state of equal rights and voting rights in America a century after most women earned the right to vote. Our guests:

Spectrum News

This past weekend marked the annual Convention Days in Seneca Falls, which highlights the Women’s Rights Convention held in that community in 1848.

But, with COVID-19, most of this year’s activities had to be handled online. There was a significant outdoor event on Saturday when four women, who are part of a professional skydiving team, landed near the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

This year also marks the centennial of the 19th Amendment, which helped women secure the right to vote.

This year, the Susan B. Anthony Museum and House is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. 2020 also marks suffragist Susan B. Anthony’s 200th birthday and the 75th anniversary of the museum.

To mark these historic occasions, the museum has invited music producer, author, and civil rights activist Tena Clark as this year’s keynote speaker for its birthday dinner celebration. Clark has worked with music legends including Aretha Franklin, Natalie Cole, Patti LaBelle, and many more. We talk with her about her career and the impact of women in music, and we have a broader discussion about the state of women’s rights in 2020. Our guests:

  • Deborah Hughes, executive director of the Susan B. Anthony Museum and House
  • Tena Clark, music producer, author, and civil rights activist

Susan B. Anthony Museum & House/Facebook

The annual Rose Parade in Pasadena, California included a connection to Rochester on New Year’s Day. Members of the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House took part in one of the floats, and it won an award.

The float called “Years of Hope, Years of Change,” was a call to inspire Americans to remember the women who paved the way for a woman’s right to vote. The float won the 'theme award’ for most outstanding presentation of the Rose Parade Theme. This year’s overall parade theme was The Power of Hope, celebrating the influence of optimism and hope.

National Women's Hall of Fame

The National Women’s Hall of Fame induction ceremony is Saturday. Attorney Gloria Allred, will be recognized as a trailblazer and pioneer for women’s rights. She is known for often taking on controversial and high-profile cases. 

Allred says she’s grateful to be recognized along with other women, some of whom, like Sonia Sotomayor are her “sheros,” as she calls them. 

Gloria Allred:

I’m just looking forward to congratulating them as well.

Beth Adams/WXXI News

The newest in the fleet of tugboats on the Erie Canal was christened Friday in honor of women’s suffrage leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

In the 19th century, the canal was like the interstate highway of the day. It was frequently the path traveled between Seneca Falls and Rochester as Cady Stanton and her fellow suffragists coordinated their campaign for women’s rights.

At Friday morning's dedication at Corn Hill Landing in Rochester, Cady Stanton's great-great-granddaughter, Coline Jenkins, said tugboats are a metaphor for the life's work of her historic ancestor.

The 2018 Seneca Falls Revisited: Women’s Equality Conference kicks off this week. It will include presentations on Frederick Douglass as a suffragist, intersectionality in the women’s movement, and more.

We talk to the conference organizers about what progress in the movement means. Our guests:

One year after worldwide women's marches, thousands more took to the streets in western New York and across the country.

We discuss the issues central to the movement. We also discuss what it means to be active, beyond marching or protesting. Our guests:

  • Mercedes Mike, education organizer for Metro Justice/Alliance for Quality Education who attended marches in Rochester in 2017 and 2018
  • Stephanie Vargas, activist who attended the 2017 march in Washington, D.C.
  • Miriam Zinter, activist who attended the 2017 march in Washington, D.C.
  • Marta Driscoll, program and outreach manager at Causewave Community Partners who attended the 2017 march in Washington, D.C.

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