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women's hall of fame

Congresswoman Louise Slaughter

The late Congresswoman Louise Slaughter will be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame on Saturday.

The Hall of Fame calls Slaughter a local and national leader whose work for women and for all Americans continues to shape our lives.

Slaughter was one of the longest-serving female members of the House of Representatives, the first chairwoman of the House Rules Committee, and co-chair and founding member of the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus.

National Women's Hall of Fame

Fashion designer and philanthropist Diane von Furstenberg has been added to this year’s National Women’s Hall of Fame inductees in Seneca Falls.

Furstenberg is the 11th member of this year’s inductees; the other 10 were announced earlier this year.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

The Seneca Falls Town Board on Tuesday night rejected a resolution to end funding for the Women's Hall of Fame if it inducts Jane Fonda.

But that was only after over an hour of passionate debate between Hall supporters and Vietnam veterans on Fonda's actions in the 1970s.

www.womenofthehall.org

A town official in the Finger Lakes wants to pull funding from the National Women’s Hall of Fame because he is not happy with one of this year’s inductees.

Seneca Falls Supervisor Greg Lazzaro has a resolution he’d like to see considered at the Town Board meeting next week which would end financial donations for events associated with the Hall, because one of this year’s inductees is Jane Fonda.

Greg Cotterill / Finger Lakes Public Radio

Hundreds of people turned out in the bitter cold and snow on Saturday in Seneca Falls for the 3rd annual Women March. It was held in conjunction with events around the country with marchers advocating for women, immigrants, people of color and LGBTQ rights. 

The starting point for Saturday’s events had to be changed due to the partial government shutdown. A morning  rally at the Women's Rights National Historical Park was moved two blocks down Fall Street to Trinity Park.

National Women's Hall of Fame

It was back in September the Hall learned it was a finalist in a program called Partners in Preservation, which featured 20 sites around the country that celebrate diversity and the struggle for equality.

This week, the National Women’s Hall of Fame  learned it is one of the 11 winning historic sites, something they accomplished with the help of an online public voting campaign.

Rebecca Petropolous is operations manager at the Hall.  She says the funding will help them in their ongoing effort to renovate the 1844 Seneca Knitting Mill into their new home.

Greg Cotterill / WXXI News

People participating in marches in the United States and around the world walked in support of female empowerment and denounced President Donald Trump's views on immigration, abortion, LGBT rights and women's rights on the anniversary of his inauguration.

That included the location often referred to as the birthplace of the women’s rights movement, Seneca Falls, where a large crowd marched Saturday by the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, among other landmarks.

Women prepare to march in Seneca Falls a year later

Jan 19, 2018
Greg Cotterill / WXXI News

This weekend, women will be marching all over the nation in the name of equality. Reverend Leah Ntuala is  pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Seneca Falls and one of the organizers for a Women’s March happening in Seneca Falls on Saturday. She says it’s time to check in since last year and ensure all women are being heard and advocated for.

Tianna Manon/WXXI News

The National Women's Hall of Fame inducted 10 women Saturday, celebrating their pioneering efforts in areas that include medicine, entertainment, the military and politics. There was also a luncheon and ceremony to celebrate 100 years since suffragists gained the right to vote in New York. 

During a conversation before the luncheon at the New York Chiropractic College, the women expressed mostly hope for the future of gender equality, especially in the workplace, which is one of the last frontiers for women's rights activists. 

Randy Gorbman / WXXI News

It was a trip back in time and also a look forward in Pittsford Thursday with five boats traveling along the Erie Canal to celebrate the centennial of  women’s suffrage docked in Carpenter Park.

This was all part of an event called VoteTilla, which set off from Seneca Falls, the home of the first women’s rights convention, and Barbara Blaisdell, who has long portrayed Susan B. Anthony at events around Rochester helped get the crowd in the mood to talk about freedom and the right to vote.

Among those attending, Suzanne Morgan of Rochester and her daughter.

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