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vape

Gagandeep Kaur, Giuseppe Lungarella and Irfan Rahman / Journal of Inflammation

Research at the University of Rochester Medical Center has found evidence of why COVID-19 is worse for people who smoke and vape than for the rest of the population.

Irfan Rahman, who runs a lab at URMC that studies the effects of tobacco products on the lungs, said people who smoke and vape often have elevated levels of receptors for an enzyme called ACE2.

Irfan Rahman / University of Rochester Medical Center

When the federal Food and Drug Administration announced it was stepping up enforcement of its rules against flavored vape products last month, the agency said the goal was to diminish the products’ appeal to young people.

The FDA specifically named fruit and mint flavors as drivers of youth use of e-cigarettes.

But many of those flavors are still available in local vape shops.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The American Lung Association has given New York state a failing grade for its funding of tobacco prevention and control programs.

The association said that grade reflects a lack of spending on efforts to prevent youths from using e-cigarettes.

New England Journal of Medicine

An Ontario County woman has died in Monroe County from injuries related to vaping.

The state health department said the woman was in her 50s, but other details are still under investigation or are not available to the public due to patient privacy concerns.

The department said investigators do not yet know exactly what the woman was vaping.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


New guidance this week from the federal Centers for Disease Control urges doctors to quickly connect patients hospitalized for vaping-related lung injuries with follow-up care after their release.

The recommendation comes after the CDC found that some people were having to be rehospitalized after their treatment for those injuries.

Nicholas Nacca, an assistant professor and medical toxicologist at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said when injury symptoms return, they can be fatal.

Lancet Respiratory Health

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center published new guidance Friday for doctors looking to diagnose lung injuries caused by vaping.

The article, published in the journal Lancet Respiratory Medicine, examined a series of patients who came to URMC with “respiratory failure of unknown origin” and a “history of e-cigarette or vape use.”

They found that x-rays of all the patients’ lungs showed signs of pneumonia and inflammation, but no evidence of infection. Ruling out infection as the cause of the respiratory failure allows doctors to move toward a diagnosis of a vaping injury, the researchers found.

Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

When school board members from around New York state gathered in Rochester for a conference this week, one of the most highly attended seminars focused on vaping.

Youth use of e-cigarettes has risen more than 150% in the state in the last five years, and members of the New York State School Boards Association who crowded into a ballroom in the Rochester Riverside Hotel said they were concerned about the trend.