WXXI AM News

sustainability

At midnight on Monday, Wegmans enacted its ban on most single-use plastic bags. That means customers can now use reusable bags or pay five cents for each paper bag. Community members are reacting to the change, with some complaining about what they call an inconvenience and added expense, while others are lauding the company for going more green. The move comes in advance of a state ban on plastic bags that begins March 1.

This hour, we discuss the impact of the change on customers and the environment, if and how other entities will follow suit, and how to have effective conversations about sustainability and recycling. Our guests:

The suburbs are often left out of conversations about modernizing transportation systems and environmental goals. But as City Lab recently pointed out, more than half of all Americans live in suburbs, and the burbs are here to stay.

So what are the options for making suburbs more suitable to multimodal options and green goals? Our guests debate it. In studio:

When it comes to fighting climate change, there tends to be two schools of thought. One says that it’s all about personal responsibility, and acting every day in a way that is sustainable. The other says it’s mostly about policy, especially on the federal level.

Our guests believe the two camps are related, and they try to live every hour in a way that is sensitive to our changing climate. So what does that look like? What changes might they inspire in others? Our guests:

  • Enid Cardinal, senior sustainability advisor to the president at RIT
  • Kimie Romeo, activist and recent environmental sustainability award winner