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Suffragists

Noelle E. C. Evans | WXXI News

 

  

Three prominent U.S. feminists in the 1800s -- Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and Lucretia Mott -- learned what women's equality could look like through personal contact with Native American women.

Historian Sally Roesch Wagner of Syracuse is the author of “Sisters in Spirit,” which chronicles the influence of Haudenosaunee women on early U.S. feminists. 

She says that the three women witnessed the mirror opposite of their own society in Haudenosaunee culture.

Susan B. Anthony Museum & House/Facebook

The annual Rose Parade in Pasadena, California included a connection to Rochester on New Year’s Day. Members of the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House took part in one of the floats, and it won an award.

The float called “Years of Hope, Years of Change,” was a call to inspire Americans to remember the women who paved the way for a woman’s right to vote. The float won the 'theme award’ for most outstanding presentation of the Rose Parade Theme. This year’s overall parade theme was The Power of Hope, celebrating the influence of optimism and hope.

Beth Adams/WXXI News

The newest in the fleet of tugboats on the Erie Canal was christened Friday in honor of women’s suffrage leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

In the 19th century, the canal was like the interstate highway of the day. It was frequently the path traveled between Seneca Falls and Rochester as Cady Stanton and her fellow suffragists coordinated their campaign for women’s rights.

At Friday morning's dedication at Corn Hill Landing in Rochester, Cady Stanton's great-great-granddaughter, Coline Jenkins, said tugboats are a metaphor for the life's work of her historic ancestor.