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rochester police

Scott Fybush / WXXI News

A Black Lives Matter protest that started peacefully Saturday afternoon ended in arrests four hours later after some protesters staged a sit-in that closed roads into downtown Rochester.

After rallying in Washington Square Park, more than a hundred protesters, including families with small children, set off on a march down Broad Street. They stopped at several points along the way to stage a die-in and a teach-in, while police looked on and controlled traffic.

Rochester Police/Twitter

The U.S. Attorney’s office says that seven people have been charged as part of a drug trafficking operation in the Rochester area.

And authorities say that ongoing investigation and the attempt to execute a search warrant is related to the incident on Burbank Street in Rochester on Monday where police shot and wounded  two men.

The U.S. Attorney’s office says the alleged drug dealers were involved in transporting and selling cocaine as well as being involved in violence that was part of the drug trade.

Rochester City Court Judge Leticia Astacio says she was involved in an incident Saturday night at  the Radio Social entertainment center, which resulted in another woman being arrested.

Rochester Police responded to the location on Carlson Road just before 9:00 p.m. for a report of a fight. As a result of the investigation, police charged 53 year old Monica Skinner of Spencerport with 2nd degree harassment, which RPD says is a relatively minor charge, similar to a traffic ticket.

In many ways, police work is more under the microscope than it has ever been. There are cameras everywhere. Citizens capture almost everything on cell phone video. Many officers welcome that; but still others say that it makes doing their jobs occasionally difficult, feeling that a single incident can be captured, without context, and cost a career.

We sit down with Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli to discuss how his officers feel about the scrutiny, and how to continue building a strong relationship with the local community. Our guests:

  • Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli
  • Rochester Police Captain Kevin Costello
  • Rochester Police Investigator Jackie Shuman

First hour: Police work in the age of cell phone cameras

Second hour: Upstate Revitalization Initiative

In many ways, police work is more under the microscope than it has ever been. There are cameras everywhere. Citizens capture almost everything on cell phone video. Many officers welcome that; but still others say that it makes doing their jobs occasionally difficult, feeling that a single incident can be captured, without context, and cost a career.

In our first hour, we'll sit down with Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli to discuss how his officers feel about the scrutiny, and how to continue building a strong relationship with the local community. Our guests:

  • Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli
  • Rochester Police Captain Kevin Costello
  • Rochester Police Investigator Jackie Shuman

In our second hour, the Rochester/Finger Lakes region was one of three regions to win the state's big economic development prize money. That means a total of $500 million is coming from the state, to be used in various ways. How, exactly, will it be spent? How should it be spent? What kinds of impacts should we look forward to? In studio, to answer those questions and more:

  • Joseph Morelle, New York State Assembly Majority Leader
  • Vincent Esposito, Empire State Development Finger Lakes Regional Director
  • Mark Peterson, Greater Rochester Enterprise President and CEO

The Rochester Police Department has confirmed that the body pulled from the waters of Lake Ontario Friday night is missing RIT student Max Maisel. The cause of death is still being determined. 

A fisherman discovered the body around 7:30 p.m. Friday night and notified the U.S. Coast Guard. The body was about 200 yards away from the Coast Guard Station. Maisel had been missing since late February when he was last seen on Charlotte Pier.