WXXI AM News

reshaping rochester 2018

Would cities look different if they were designed primarily by women? Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman thinks so. She’s an urban anthropologist advocating for gender equality in urban design.

Johnston-Zimmerman will be in Rochester next week to speak at the Community Design Center's Reshaping Rochester Series, but first, she joins us on Connections to share her research and ideas. Our guests:

Does Rochester have to consider climate change or environmental sustainability when designing its urban spaces? That question has a more obvious answer in places like Miami Beach, where climate change is already impacting where people can live, and how. But what about Rochester? What does sustainability mean here, especially when we think about our urban spaces? 

The Community Design Center of Rochester is getting ready for their next event in the Reshaping Rochester series, and they have a designer with a distinguished and somewhat unusual resume. Mark Dawson is one of just eleven national members for the American Society of Landscape Architects' blue ribbon panel on climate change. He's in Rochester to discuss the evolution of civic parks and open space design over the last several decades.

We sit down with Dawson to discuss trends in urban design, how architects can respond to climate change, and more. In studio:

What can Rochester learn from a city like Birmingham, Michigan? The city – just north of Detroit – has been hailed for completely implementing a plan called New Urbanism. The plan led to the building up of Birmingham’s downtown, higher commercial rent and land values, “complete streets,” and one of the most walkable cities in America.

Birmingham’s commissioner is an urbanist, an architect, and the city’s former mayor. We talk to him about the revitalization of his city, and what he thinks can be applied in Rochester. In studio: