WXXI AM News

photography

NARADA J. RILEY

Until this summer, the coat rack in Martin Hawk’s home was a spot to set his keys and wallet and other everyday personal items. Now, it’s a place for his gas mask.

“None of us were prepared for the tear gas and the pepper spray,” Hawk says.

Hawk is a photographer embedded in what he calls the “battleground” of downtown Rochester, documenting the Black Lives Matter demonstrations that have rattled the halls of power and earned international media attention.

When service members leave active duty for civilian life, they may face challenges. Female veterans report that they have specific hurdles that are hard to overcome — including a lack of social support.

We sit down with several female veterans who share their stories, and a new project they worked on called Eyes Front. It’s a photography and writing collaboration where they’ve documented their experiences. We talk to them about what they want the community to know. In studio:

  • Jennifer Wiese, veteran, social worker at the Rochester Vet Center, and participant in the Eyes Front program
  • Jade Starr, veteran and participant in the Eyes Front program
  • Megan Charland, director of photography and digital arts at Flower City Arts Center

A number of RIT alumni have been selected as winners or finalists for Pulitzer Prizes in photojournalism. The alumni have been recognized with 13 prizes over the last decade. Several of those winners are in Rochester this week to share their work and discuss the art of visual storytelling. They join us in a special two-part broadcast today and Thursday.

This hour, we sit down with Paula Bronstein, a 2011 finalist in Breaking News Photography who was recognized for her coverage of historic floods in Pakistan. We’re also joined by David Carson, a 2015 winner in Breaking News Photography who captured images of Ferguson, Missouri after the death of Michael Brown. In studio:

  • William Snyder, four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, and chair of the Photojournalism Program at RIT
  • Paula Bronstein, photojournalist who was a 2011 Pulitzer Prize finalist in Breaking News Photography
  • David Carson, photojournalist who was a 2015 Pulitzer Prize winner in Breaking News Photography

Facebook deleted a photo of a starving Yemeni child, saying that the photo was inappropriate content. The photo came from a column written by Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times. Kristof criticized Facebook, saying that as a media gatekeeper, they were preventing the world from seeing how dire and tragic the situation has become for thousands of children.

Twenty four hours later, Facebook relented, saying that the deletion was a mistake. That has kicked off fresh debate on a number of levels. How does Facebook decide what we are, and are not, allowed to see? What kind of problems are created if we censor photographs of this nature? Our guests discuss it: 

  • William Snyder, four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, and chair of the photojournalism program at RIT
  • Jenn Poggi, assistant professor of photojournalism at RIT, and former photo editor for the Associated Press and U.S. News & World Report
  • Scott Malouf, attorney whose work focuses on the intersection of social media and the law

‘Big Shot’ heading to Old Fort Niagara

Aug 9, 2018
RIT Big Shot Team

The 33rd “Big Shot” community photo project will focus on a historical site next month.

The subject of Rochester Institute of Technology’s photographic project this year is Old Fort Niagara in Youngstown, Niagara County.

The Sept. 29 event will capture a nighttime image of the fort, which has a past that spans more than 300 years.

You may have seen the recent TIME Magazine cover that juxtaposed President Donald Trump and the image of a crying child at the American border. It turns out, that child had not been separated from her parents, and now there are questions about whether TIME should have used the image at all.

Our panel of photographers and journalists weighs in. In studio:

  • William Snyder, four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, and chair of the Photojournalism Program at RIT
  • Jenn Poggi, assistant professor of photojournalism at RIT, and former photo editor for the Associated Press and U.S. News & World Report

A new documentary called Photo City tells the story of Rochester’s past, present, and future as a hub for photography. It will be screened as part of the One Take Film Fest at The Little Theatre.

The filmmakers are from Ireland, and we talk to one of them about why his team chose Rochester as the subject of the film. We also hear from local photographers and filmmakers who will share their take on Rochester as a photo city. Our guests:

  • John Murphy, co-director, co-writer, and editor of Photo City
  • Arleen Thaler, socially-engaged photojournalist
  • Jack Garner, retired national film critic for Gannett Newspapers
  • Linda Moroney, filmmaker, and director and programmer for the One Take Film Festival

WATCH: Legendary Kodak photographer Neil Montanus Turns 90

Apr 12, 2017

Walt Disney. Women of the Maassia tribe. Models. Children. Landscapes. There seems to be no shortage of people, moments, and memories captured by legendary Kodak photographer Neil Montanus. The man whose images have been seen and celebrated by millions around the world is now celebrating a rebirth of sorts in his career….at age 90. Just before his special exhibition, Neil Montanus joins this edition of Need to Know with his son Jim Montanus – a fellow photographer and owner of Montanus Gallery.

Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer William Snyder is known for his work capturing newsmakers, but it turns out that his passion isn't necessarily photographing world leaders. It's The Who.

In 1993, Snyder photographed Pete Townshend, when Townshend was involved with the Broadway production of his rock opera, Tommy. Since then, Snyder has toured with the band, and captured some classic images. We have a little fun talking about the craft of photographing great bands, and previewing a new exhibit at RIT. Our guest:

  • William Snyder, RIT photojournalism professor and longtime photographer of The Who

On Monday, December 19, a Turkish assassin shot and killed Russia's ambassador to Turkey. Associated Press photographer Burhan Ozbilici captured some remarkable images of the immediate aftermath, including the killer ranting with a finger in the air, the ambassador's body lying just a few feet away. The New York Times, among other publications, chose to run that photograph on the front page, despite its graphic and disturbing nature. A number of readers protested that decision, saying that the image was too grisly, or that it glorified terrorism in some fashion.

We discuss such decisions, and why even the most disturbing images can have vital news value. Our guests:

  • Max Schulte, Democrat & Chronicle lead photographer
  • Jenn Poggi, assistant professor of photojournalism at RIT, and former photo editor for the Associated Press and U.S. News & World Report

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