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new york state

Daniel M. Vasta/RIT

In upstate, the minimum wage is at $9, but will rise to $12.50 by the end of 2020. It is an issue that affects many across upstate, from farmers and small business owners to the workers themselves.

Anthony Emmi is the general manager of Emmi and Sons Farm in Baldwinsville, just outside of Syracuse. Among the crops are tomatoes, squash and peppers.

"I raise about seven acres now, the bell peppers," Emmi said. "I started cutting back, we were at 72 acres. We used to ship up and down the East Coast. Now, New York state is it."

Matt Ryan New York Now

It looks like U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer will be re-elected to a fourth term on Nov. 8, barring any major turn of events. He’s about 40 points ahead of his nearest opponent in the polls, and the bigger question now is: Will Schumer be the next Senate minority leader or majority leader?

Schumer is running for re-election, but he’s not exactly campaigning. He’s mostly just continuing what he’s been doing for years — relentlessly traveling New York state, focusing on local issues. 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said much of the responsibility for the alleged corruption scandal touching his administration is on the state university system, specifically SUNY Polytechnic Institute, which oversaw many of the contracts.

But reform groups say the governor is not telling the whole story.

Cuomo has made several public appearances since U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara issued criminal complaints against nine people, including several close to Cuomo and two major upstate real estate developers.

Opponents Urge Cuomo to Say No to Pipeline Expansion

Sep 21, 2016
Karen DeWitt/file photo

Opponents of a pipeline expansion that would flow through vast portions of New York want the Cuomo administration to deny a key permit, an act that could halt the upgrade. 

The New Market Dominion pipeline is one of a dizzying array of fuel pipelines that flow through New York, in many cases taking natural gas from hydrofracking sites in other states to markets in New York and other places.

ALBANY (AP) A leading business advocacy organization is calling on New York state lawmakers to cut taxes for small businesses and fight large increases to the minimum wage in 2016.

The Business Council of New York State's agenda for 2016 also calls for big investments in roads, bridges and other infrastructure and stronger workforce development efforts.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has called on lawmakers to gradually increase the minimum wage from its current $9 an hour to $15.

That has concerned many business owners who said it will lead to higher prices and fewer jobs.

We examine the minimum wage debate, which has heated up in Albany. Governor Cuomo has proposed raising the state minimum wage to $10.50 in 2017 (and $11.50 in New York City). Assembly Democrats have proposed $10.50 in 2017, $12.60 in 2019, and they want to attach the wage to inflation. A coalition of business groups have released a statement opposing any new increase in the minimum wage. Our guests will debate:

Greg Biryla, executive director of Unshackle Upstate
Colin O'Malley, Metro Justice

Veronica Volk / WXXI

Governor Cuomo invites Upstate New York regions to compete for $1.5 billion  in grants. As part of the Economic Revitalization Competition, three winning regions will be granted $500 million each.

Cuomo says the competition is an important aspect of the project.

"If I just gave you the money, you wouldn't do all the hard things you have to do to actually get the money. And the competition amongst yourselves -- I'm telling you -- brings up the performance of everybody."

Chris Campbell

As the temperature dips, utility bills are on the rise, and more and more people are unable to pay their heating costs.

Let's say you're behind on your utilities bill. First of all, you're not alone - according to figures from the Public Service Commission, more than one million New York households were late on their bills this past November. Gas and electric cutoffs by utilities companies in 2014 were up fourteen percent from 2013.

David Irwin of AARP attributes this increase to high heating costs.

Good tax policy or bribe? The state recently mailed thousands of checks for $350 out to NY families. Who got the money? Why is it being mailed so close to Election Day if this was agreed upon nearly 18 months ago? We'll look at the politics, and we'll explore whether this is actually effective fiscal and economic policy. We'll hear (in pre-recorded comments) from Joe Morelle and Brian Kolb. Then we talk with our in-studio guests:

  • Erika Rosenberg, Associate Director of the Center for Governmental Research
  • Andrea Hickerson, RIT journalism professor

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