WXXI AM News

NASA

NASA says it's time to "touch the sun." In 2018, the agency will send a spacecraft close to the sun's surface. NASA says the mission could help us understand some of the mysteries involving the star: why its atmosphere is hotter than its surface; what allows it to fling winds out at supersonic speeds; and more.

Our guests walk us through the details and explain what they mean for the future of space research and travel. In studio:

  • Brian Koberlein, senior lecturer of physics at RIT, and blogger for Forbes and One Universe at a Time
  • Roger Dube, research professor and director of the Science Exploration Program at RIT

Early Monday morning, in the pre-dawn hours, a fiery meteor was seen streaking across the sky in the Midwest. No one was hurt and it was largely harmless, but it was so large that it could be seen as far away as Nebraska and New York. The sighting left many people asking where it came from.

NASA researchers study meteors and other Near-Earth Objects, as well as the possibility of these objects hitting the Earth and causing larger scale disasters. However, funding for this research may be in question under the Trump administration. We discuss all of this with our guests: