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Move to Include

An effort by the parents of a Gates Chili student with disabilities to allow their daughter to use a service dog has been settled eight years after that battle began.

Devyn Pereira needed the dog to help her get through the school day, but the district said her parents would need to provide a full-time dog handler.

Five years ago, the U.S. Justice Department sued on behalf of Devyn, and this week, the settlement was announced.

Devyn’s mother, Heather Burroughs, was pleased with the resolution of the long-pending case.

Willow and Deaf IGNITE announce partnership

Aug 4, 2020
deafignite.org

Two organizations that have collaborated for several years have now announced a formal partnership to strengthen the ways this community responds to domestic violence and increase access to services and programs.

Willow Center President and CEO Meaghan de Chateauview says staff from Deaf IGNITE, which advocates for Deaf domestic violence survivors, will join Willow, so now the center can offer specialized services.

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Gerard Buckley still clearly remembers July 26, 1990.

On that day, he stood alongside dozens of others in the White House Rose Garden, as then-President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act into law.

"It was really amazing," Buckley recalled. "It was everything I wish the country was today. The Republicans, the Democrats, the independents, the business community, leaders from the disability community all came together."

That day, Buckley was a young deaf man. Today, he is president of RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

Max Schulte / WXXI News

Until recently, Sherrodney Fulmore rode a bus to get to and from his job at Wegmans.

From his home in Rochester’s 19th Ward to the Holt Road Wegmans in Webster, the trip usually took about an hour, he said.

Fulmore rode on the Regional Transit Service’s Access buses -- the smaller shuttle-size buses that offer curb-to-curb service for people with disabilities.

But when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Rochester area, Fulmore stopped riding the bus.

“We wanted to cut the chance of him getting sick,” said his father, Frank Fulmore.

White House Historical Association

July 26 is the 30th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in several areas, including employment and access to government services.

Rebecca Cokley, who served in the Obama administration and is currently the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress, recently talked to WXXI's Alex Crichton about the progress that has been made since the ADA went into effect and how much remains to be done.

As we've explored in recent conversations, the pandemic has posed unique challenges for people with disabilities. For adults and children with autism, stay-at-home orders and the closure of schools and support programs has led to isolation and gaps in social support.

This hour, our guests explore how caregivers and parents can help bridge those gaps, especially with the uncertainty over whether schools will reopen in the fall. Our guests: 

  • Jacob Collier, self advocate
  • Rachel Rosner, director of education and support services for AutismUp
  • Alison Steixner, parent and educator

This story is part of Move to Include, an initiative that uses the power of public media to inform and transform attitudes and behaviors about inclusion. Move to Include was founded by WXXI and the Golisano Foundation and expanded with a grant by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.

Max Schulte / WXXI News

Jon Seiger was 32 years old when he lost his hearing to an infection. He calls the experience “surreal.”

“Just walking through the world and breathing and not hearing your own breath all of the sudden was very odd,” he says. “And it made life feel bizarre and surreal, and I was kind of separated from the world.”

COVID-19 has meant some difficult times for a lot of people, but those living with disabilities have been facing unique challenges.

A WXXI live forum on the impact of COVID-19 on people with disabilities aired Thursday night on WXXI TV and radio. The virtual forum featured interviews with people who have disabilities or who are working with those with disabilities.

WXXI News covers Governor Cuomo’s press briefing from Albany. Following that, we have a discussion about issues affecting people with disabilities – especially those pertaining to the pandemic. This week, the WXXI News team has presented a series of pieces about disparities and inclusion. It’s part of the Move to Include project, a partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation.

This hour, our colleagues highlight different issues affecting people with disabilities in our community. Our guests:

  • Erin McCormack, executive producer for WXXI Public Media
  • James Brown, reporter for WXXI News

Memorial Art Gallery

Earlier this month, people around the world sat down to watch "Hamilton" -- the Broadway musical phenomenon written by Lin-Manuel Miranda about the titular founding father.

And they did so from their own homes, giving everyone with a Disney+ subscription access to a show they might not have seen otherwise.

Imagine if art was this accessible all the time.

“It’s not hard to do,” says Gregg Beratan, director of development for the Center for Disability Rights in Rochester. “We have decades of research of making venues more accessible.”

It’s been 30 years since the Americans with Disabilities Act was passed, mandating public spaces be accessible to all. But it’s still an ongoing battle.

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