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Memorial Art Gallery

MAG’s Clothesline Festival goes virtual

Jul 31, 2020
CITY Newspaper/File photo

The Memorial Art Gallery’s 2020 Clothesline Festival, originally scheduled for September 12-13, will be held exclusively online as a week-long event this fall, from September 12-18, the museum announced Friday.

In an email to subscribers, MAG Director Jonathan Binstock said that the change in the annual arts festival’s format was, unsurprisingly, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Memorial Art Gallery

Earlier this month, people around the world sat down to watch "Hamilton" -- the Broadway musical phenomenon written by Lin-Manuel Miranda about the titular founding father.

And they did so from their own homes, giving everyone with a Disney+ subscription access to a show they might not have seen otherwise.

Imagine if art was this accessible all the time.

“It’s not hard to do,” says Gregg Beratan, director of development for the Center for Disability Rights in Rochester. “We have decades of research of making venues more accessible.”

It’s been 30 years since the Americans with Disabilities Act was passed, mandating public spaces be accessible to all. But it’s still an ongoing battle.

Three of Rochester’s largest cultural attractions: the Memorial Art Gallery, Rochester Museum and Science Center, and The Strong National Museum of Play, will open Saturday, June 27, as part of New York Forward’s Phase 4 for reopening. Governor Andrew Cuomo said this week the Finger Lakes and four other regions are on track to begin Phase 4 on Friday.

The George Eastman Museum will remain closed until mid-July due to construction on the Thomas Tischer Visitor Center. The Strong and MAG will be open to members only to start, and RMSC will be open to the general public.

Provided by Judith Schaechter

Had it been a minute faster, or a minute slower, on a 2,825-mile journey, the Titanic might have been just another passenger ship that never met an iceberg.

That's the cruelty of timing. We're seeing it now in the arts, as musicians gauge whether they should release a new work in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, or wait until it's OK to throw a party.

Provided

Four of Rochester’s biggest museums -- the Memorial Art Gallery, The Strong the Rochester Museum & Science Center and George Eastman Museum-- announced Friday afternoon that they will join the exploding number of closings driven by the coronavirus pandemic.

The Strong announced that it will be closed as of 8 p.m. Friday, with plans to re-open on April 13. RMSC closed its doors to the public at 5 p.m. Friday, with plans to stay closed through March 27.

Zoo closed, too

Provided by Joe Pug

Two questions into this phone interview, where Joe Pug is at his home in Maryland, he's called away to an emergency.

"I have to go poopy."

A few minutes later, 3-year-old Rudy's all squared away and has settled in front of the television for some cartoons.

Poopy. "That's the stay-at-home dad life," Joe Pug says. "When I'm not on the road, I'm at home with my kids."

Find more arts coverage at WXXINews.org.

Paolo Brillo

At age 76, Eric Andersen considers himself to be in "The Danger Zone."

"Half the people I knew are not around anymore," he says. "Townes is gone, Lou Reed is gone, Rick Danko is gone, Janis is gone. Joni, almost.

"You can't argue with gravity and health."

Provided by Multibird

We're slogging through the final week of 2019, but already I just may have heard the best local album of 2020.

The official release date for the new, self-titled album by Seth Faergolzia's Multibird is Jan. 1, but you can get a few hours' head start at the official release show at 8 p.m. New Year's Eve at Skylark Lounge.

The prolific Faergolzia assembled Multibird from the cosmic silt of his previous bands, Dufus and 23 Psaegz, the latter born of his desire to create a soundtrack for his puppet opera and accompanying film, "Moon Shaped Head Girl." 

MAG's Mucha exhibit deeper than decorative arts

Oct 30, 2019
Provided

Whenever museums or galleries host large-scale exhibitions of work by household-name master artists, they're faced with the challenge of making the show into more than a dazzling display of familiar beauty. Sure, the draw of seeing works created by the actual hands of immortalized artists is enough to pull the public through the doors, but that's not enough for the delightful nerds who become curators, nor many of the delightful nerds in the audience.

Tianna Manon/WXXI News

There’s a new partnership in an effort to bring a strong, multi-media focus on the life of Frederick Douglass. The famed abolitionist, who spent years in Rochester and published his anti-slavery newspaper The North Star here, has been honored over the last year, to mark the 200th anniversary of his birth.

Now, the Memorial Art Gallery, the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commemoration Committee and St. John Fisher College are working together to bring even more attention to Douglass’s life and what he stood for.

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