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Marijuana

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday signed a bill into law that further decriminalizes marijuana possession in New York state. The law ends criminal prosecution for possession of up to 2 ounces of cannabis.

The action comes on a day when the governor also signed new gun control measures into law. 

Under the law, possession of up to 1 ounce of the drug would be punishable by a $50 fine. Having up to 2 ounces of cannabis would bring a $200 fine. The measure also creates a mechanism to expunge the records for some past marijuana convictions.

Members of the New York State Assembly join us to discuss what did – and did not – get done in the recent legislative session. We talk about jobs, marijuana, health care, climate, the Rochester City School District, and more.

Our guests are Assemblymember Harry Bronson and Assemblymember Mark Johns.

At a conference on marijuana hosted by the Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, law enforcement officials acknowledged that current laws around the drug are not enforced equally.

“We want to treat everybody equally, obviously, and we’re not doing that,” said Monroe County Undersheriff Korey Brown, speaking on a panel about legal issues surrounding marijuana. “So we need to make a change.”

Brown said people of color and people who live in impoverished neighborhoods often bear the brunt of policing, especially when it comes to marijuana.

WATCH: Looking at the effects of legalized pot in New York

Apr 11, 2019

To legalize or not to legalize, that’s the big question in the Empire State when it comes to recreational marijuana. While the deal was a no-go in the recently passed state budget, proponents say it will happen and we all need to get ready for it. But organizations who oppose the legalization of pot are expected to use the delay to try to prevent the legislation from passing. On this special edition of Need to Know, the WXXI News team examines how cannabis could potentially affect our community, including jobs, health care, and the economy.

wnyc.org

With recreational marijuana on the horizon, how could New Yorkers expect the culture to change?

The push for cannabis regulation and prohibition began in the early 1900s, and really took off in the 1930s.

Nick Robertson, an assistant professor of criminal justice at Rochester Institute of Technology, said this was due in large part to propaganda like the film “Reefer Madness.”

"If you smoke marijuana, you were gonna go crazy," he said. "You were going to do horrible things, it would destroy your life, and ever since then, there’s been a stigma attached."

Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

As New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the state Legislature indicate they’re moving closer to legalizing recreational marijuana, users and prescribers of medical cannabis – particularly in rural areas – have been wondering what the change will mean for them.

New York state keeps a list of medical marijuana practitioners in each county who agree to be named publicly.

In January, Governor Andrew Cuomo unveiled a plan to legalize recreational marijuana in New York State. The proposal has led to a debate.

We sit down with members of Roc NORML, a group that supports the decriminalization of cannabis; and members of local law enforcement, who who say legalizing marijuana would negatively impact traffic safety and impose additional costs to police departments. 

In studio:

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is set to release details of a plan to make recreational marijuana legal in New York state when he outlines his budget proposal later this month. Even the governor concedes, though, that there are many unanswered questions about how to proceed.

Cuomo, who less than two years ago called marijuana a “gateway drug,” said he still has some questions and concerns about legalizing the drug for recreational use. But he said he’s working with a panel of experts, including law enforcement and health officials who have determined it can be done safely and that the “benefits outweigh the risks.”

The governor said his position also has been influenced by neighboring states that have legalized marijuana or are in the process of doing so.

“You’ll just force people to drive to Massachusetts or drive to New Jersey and then come back into this state and use it in this state,” Cuomo said.

wnyc.org

 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday urged the New York State Legislature to legalize recreational marijuana in an address in New York City. The move would make New York the 11th state in the country to take the step.

Reaction in Monroe County has been mixed, and advocates said they are still unsure what the regulations might ultimately look like.

www.cbsnews.com

The New York state health department has recommended easing access to medical marijuana.

In a report released this week, the department said it needs to find a balance between “relieving the pain and suffering of those in desperate need of a treatment,” and protecting the public from risks to health and safety.

The recommendations outlined in the report tend to support expansion of the medical marijuana program.

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