WXXI AM News

literature

Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. That has set off a debate about whether music lyrics can be literature.

Our guests tangle over the Dylan selection; we also evaluate his work for the best examples of music as literature. And if Dylan can win, who else from his industry? Joni Mitchell? Justin Timberlake? Okay, maybe not Joni Mitchell. Our guests:

  • John Covach, director of the Institute for Popular Music at the University of Rochester
  • James McCorkle, assistant professor of Africana studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges
  • Chad Post, publisher, Open Letter Books
  • Roy Stein, director of the music business program at Nazareth College

Connections: Read Local

Sep 23, 2016

Like the local food movement, Read Local is a program that seeks to get readers to enjoy books grown right in their own back yard. It is a book club and event series, highlighting books published by publishing houses based right here in Rochester. The idea is to read the book, meet the author, and support local businesses along the way. 

We meet author Josefine Klougart, and we discuss a range of issues, including translations and foreign books, the health of publishing, and more. Our guests:

David Denby is a writer and a lover of classic literature who wanted to know if modern students could be taught to love and value great books. Maybe it's a question that's been around for centuries: How can we make kids love books? But it's more challenging, seemingly intractable now. Kids read texts. They rarely read books.

Denby set out to know whether it's possible to bring the classics into the hearts and minds of students in Manhattan, and Westchester, and an impoverished district in Connecticut. He found inspiring teachers, and he found students slowly unlocking the mysteries in books like The Scarlet Letter. He's our guest for the hour, discussing his book, Lit Up, with a focus on how to preserve literature in the digital age.

Born In the USA is perhaps one of the most misunderstood songs in American history. This week, we've heard several radio stations play it as an homage to American greatness at the Olympics. Someone should tell them the song is about how awful our country was to Vietnam veterans.

But that has us wondering: what are the most mistaken or misunderstood pieces of art across the genres? From music to painting to poetry to literature, our panel tells us where we're routinely going wrong. (We're looking at you, Guy With the Road Not Taken Poster.) Our guests:

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