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lgbtq

When civil rights attorney Milo Primeaux read the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in favor of workplace protections for LGBTQ workers on Monday, he said he cried. 

Primeaux said this is a victory for the movement.

“This community has so historically and systematically been kicked down and oppressed by the government and by communities in so many myriad ways,” he said.

Primeaux’s practice focuses on LGBTQ legal matters. The ruling came days after the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services revoked health care and health insurance protections for LGBTQ people.

How does LGBTQ history relate to social justice issues for the community today? Speakers at the third annual Anthony Mascioli Rainbow Dialogues will discuss that question this Saturday during a series of community conversations. This year’s event will focus on intersectionality in LGBTQ activism, transgender rights issues, and responses to the AIDS crisis.

Our guests preview the event. In studio:

Finding housing can be a challenge for many older Americans, but older adults who identify as LGBTQ say it can be particularly daunting due to issues related to possible discrimination. An organization called Senior Action in a Gay Environment is teaming up with the Human Rights Campaign Foundation to assess how long-term care facilities are treating residents who are part of the LGBTQ community. 

This hour, we discuss the state of housing options for LGBTQ adults, fair-housing practices, and what inclusive and welcoming housing looks like. In studio:

LGBTQ activist Edie Windsor was in the process of writing her memoir, "A Wild and Precious Life," when she died at the age of 88. Windsor's landmark 2013 Supreme Court case -- which took on the Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 -- expanded the definition of "spouse" to include some-sex partners, and made them eligible for federal benefits previously limited to heterosexuals. In her book, Windsor shares her journey from hiding her sexual identity to becoming an outspoken LGBTQ activist.

Her widow, Judith Kasen-Windsor is in Rochester to discuss Windsor's book and her impact on history. She joins us in studio, along with local activists. In studio:

  • Judith Kasen-Windsor, LGBTQ activist and Edie Windsor's surviving spouse
  • Assemblymember Harry Bronson (D), District 138
  • Evelyn Bailey, executive producer of the Shoulders to Stand On Documentary 

The ImageOut Film Festival is back. The annual event presents LGBT arts and cultural experiences to promote awareness and foster dialogue. It kicks off this Thursday.

We preview this year's lineup, including a film called “For They Know Not What They Do,” which explores the evangelical church’s reaction to LGBTQ issues. We also discuss the film, "Unsettled," which tells the story of LGBTQ refugees seeking asylum in the U.S. after being persecuted in their home countries. Our guests:

New research from Pew Research Center shows that American support for same sex marriage has almost perfectly flipped in the last 15 years. In 2004, 60 percent of Americans polled said they opposed same-sex marriage, while 31 percent said they supported it. In 2019, 31 percent of Americans polled say they oppose same-sex marriage, while 61 percent say they support it.

For the LGBTQ community in Gen Z, life is very different than it was for their parents and grandparents. We talk with an older lesbian couple about their lifelong journey towards accepting themselves and feeling accepted by others. In studio:

  • Barb Adams and Roz Pullara

April Franklin / WXXI News

It has been 50 years since the Stonewall uprising in New York City, and over the weekend, the Rochester LGBTQ community and its supporters participated in the annual ROC Pride parade held Saturday on Park Avenue, while also honoring Rochester’s own gay rights history.

The Stonewall Inn was a gay bar in Greenwich Village where a police raid sparked a rebellion that fueled the modern LGBTQ rights movement.

We celebrate Rochester Pride Week with a conversation about "Transformation Thursday." It's a new podcast hosted and produced by Amy Stephens and Penny Sterling, two local transgender woman who are outspoken advocates for the LGBTQ community.

Stephens and Sterling join us to share their individual journeys, what they have learned, how they handle difficult conversations with friends and coworkers, and more. 

  • Amy Stephens, comedian and co-host of  "Transformation Thursday"
  • Penny Sterling, storyteller, comedian, and co-host of "Transformation Thursday"

During the season premiere of the PBS Kids’ show “Arthur,” Arthur’s teacher, Mr. Ratburn, got married. The episode, “Mr. Ratburn and the Special Someone,” featured the wedding of Mr. Ratburn and his partner, Patrick. The show is the latest in a series of children’s television programs and books to highlight diverse characters and inclusive storylines.

This hour, we discuss the value of inclusion on screen and in print – as well as behind the scenes – and the learning goals for children. Our guests:

  • Lesli Rotenberg, chief programming executive and general manager for children’s media and education at PBS
  • Cara Rager, manager of educational training and family engagement at WXXI Education
  • Leslie C. Youngblood, author of “Love Like Sky”
  • Ed Popil (Mrs. Kasha Davis), local drag performer and children's book author

We sit down with people of color in the local LGBTQ community to discuss identity, how they find belonging, and how they recruit allies. Our guests share their personal stories, the challenges they face – including healthcare disparities – and their ideas for how to create a more inclusive society.

In studio:

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