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landmark society

Somewhere in your hometown, there is probably a historic building that you hope will be protected – a home, and old church, a beautiful barn. Each year, the Landmark Society of Western New York publishes a list called the Five to Revive. The goal is to raise awareness – and perhaps funding – for revitalizing these historic sites.

Our panel helps us explore the 2019 selections, and we discuss how adapting and revitalizing historic spaces can impact neighborhoods. Our guests:

When historic buildings and spaces are successfully preserved, they help tell the stories of the communities that used and cared about them. But what happens when the majority of preservation professionals are white?

Diversity and inclusion in the preservation profession is the focus of an upcoming conference hosted by the Landmark Society of Western New York. This year’s keynote speaker is Lee Bey, a photographer, writer, lecturer, and consultant whose work centers on the interpretation of the built environment. Specifically, Bey explores the political, social, and racial forces that shape spaces.

This hour, we discuss how the preservation movement can be more inclusive, and how spaces and places would look different if more voices of color were included in preservation conversations. Our guests:

Does historic preservation need a new approach? According to a recent piece in City Lab, the preservation landscape is changing, and the preservation process is facing big challenges.

We sit down with local preservationists to discuss what changes might be needed in related to standards, financing, sustainability, perceptions, and more. In studio:

How can we balance historic preservation with economic development?

This fall, the Landmark Society released its annual "Five to Revive" list. A site in Seneca Falls has generated some debate, and a bit of pushback from area residents who question the mission to save the former National Yeast building. Developers have discussed turning the building into a convenience store; the Landmark Society has visions of mixed use, space for artists, and more -- just not a convenience store. But some residents say the area is a kind of food desert, and there is a need for even a chain store.

It's an example of the debates communities must have moving forward. Our guests discuss it:

  • Caitlin Meives, preservation planner for the Landmark Society
  • Larry Francer, associate director of preservation for the Landmark Society
  • Josh Durso, former Seneca Falls resident, and columnist for the Finger Lakes Times
  • Emil Bove, Seneca Falls resident, local attorney, and former member of several local town boards
  • Mitch Gruber, member of Rochester City Council and chief programs officer for Foodlink

We're joined by members of the Landmark Society and the Out Alliance to talk about historic places in our community that have played a pivotal role in the LGBTQ movement. Those organizations are leading a new walking tour that is part of the Landmark Society's LGBTQ Landmark Initiative

We discuss the initiative and Rochester's contributions to the LGBTQ movement. In studio:

  • Larry Francer, associate director of preservation for the Landmark Society of Western NY
  • Wayne Goodman, executive director of the Landmark Society of Western NY
  • Carol Ebersole-Weiss, member of the national board of governors for the Human Rights Campaign, and western new coordinator of the Human Rights Campaign of Greater New York
  • Evelyn Bailey, historian for the Out Alliance

The Trump administration's proposed tax plan would eliminate the federal historical tax credit, and this has many local preservationists concerned about the future of saving historic buildings in our area.

We discuss what eliminating the tax credit could mean for those properties. In studio:

  • Larry Francer, associate director of preservation for the Landmark Society of Western NY
  • Daniel Mackay, deputy commissioner for historical preservation at the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
  • Dan McEneny, public outreach coordinator for the New York State Division for Historic Preservation
  • Patrick Dutton, local developer focused on Downtown Rochester

Calling all carpenters, masons, painters, and craftspeople: New York needs you. State and federal tax credits are making it more financially feasible for property owners to restore historic buildings, but there’s a challenge when it comes to finding people with the skills to do the work. While there are veteran craftspeople of the traditional trades in our area, many are approaching retirement, leaving a valuable skills gap.

The traditional trades were on the Landmark Society’s “Five to Revive” list last year, and creating more pathways to these careers has been identified as a priority for the New York State Historic Preservation Plan.

So how can we inspire and train the next generation of craftspeople? The Landmark Society of Western New York will explore this question during its upcoming “Preservation NYS” conference. Our guests preview the conference and discuss efforts to revive the traditional trades. In studio:

  • Caitlin Meives, preservation planner for the The Landmark Society of Western New York
  •  Wayne Goodman, executive director of the The Landmark Society of Western New York
  • Amy Nicole Swift, principal and owner of Building Hugger
  • Daniel McEneny, public outreach coordinator for the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

The Landmark Society of Western New York has released its 2016 "Five to Revive," a list of local historic buildings, landscapes, and structures in need of investment. By rehabilitating the five on the list, the Landmark Society hopes they become catalytic projects for their communities.

We break down this year's list and talk about the progress made with last year's selections. Our guests:

  • Wayne Goodman, executive director of the Landmark Society of Western New York
  • Caitlin Meives, preservation planner for the Landmark Society of Western New York
  • Larry Francer, associate director of Preservation for the Landmark Society of Western New York
  • Steve Jordan, window restoration/repair craftsman, and author of The Window Sash Bible 
  • Erin Anheier, Orleans County resident, advocate for Hillside Cemetery & Chapel, and Five to Revive committee member
  • Sage Gerling, director of Neighborhood Initiatives for the City of Geneva

Do you know the story of Stonewall? Many Americans don't, even though it's become a national monument, and a tremendously important place in the gay rights movement.

The Landmark Society is getting ready to host a community meeting to identify landmarks of significance in the Rochester LGBTQ community. We discuss possible Rochester LGBTQ landmarks, and we explore the history of Stonewall as well. Our guests:

On Wednesday, a team from Buffalo's Olmsted Parks Conservancy is visiting Rochester to share its success stories. You might not have known that Olmsted was thinking at least in part about the boulevards and squares of Paris when he created Buffalo's coordinated system of parks. And next Sunday, Genesee Valley Park is hosting the annual Olmsted Birthday Bash.

So first, a little history: who was Frederick Law Olmsted, again? And why was he such a massive figure in American parks and design? We explore the potential of capitalizing on Olmsted's work well into the 21st century. Our guests:

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