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John Dady

Provided

Rochester’s modest open window of summer has been slammed shut by the coronavirus pandemic. Among many other pleasures of the season, the lunchtime Hochstein at High Falls live music has been lost.

But not virtually lost. The Rochester musicians John Dady, Hanna PK and Womba Africa Drumming are teaming up for an hour of Hochstein at High Falls brought to you on whatever device you’ve packed along with your lunch. Just like the live outdoor series of past years, it starts at noon Thursday.

The show is a celebration of The Hochstein School’s 100th anniversary this year.

Screenshot from Facebook.com

Here's what the coronavirus pandemic is teaching us:

Slow down.

HomeStage: John Dady

Apr 16, 2020

Looks like we won't have live in-person concerts for a bit, so we'll bring some performances to you, with a series called HomeStage.

Jeff Spevak presents Rochester Music Hall of Famer John Dady. We'll have more performances for you by Rochester's talented musicians from the most intimate stage of all...their homes! 

Joseph Boggess

Music is a time machine. Thirty-six years, "It's hard for me to get my head around that … " says Joe Locke.

It's been almost four decades since the birth of "In Front of the Silver Screen," if you're lucky enough to find a vinyl copy of it, the only form in which it officially exists. It's the hard-to-find debut album by who was to become one of the world's pre-eminent jazz vibraphonists. The liner notes insist the album was recorded on June 1 and 2, 1983, although Locke thinks it might have been two sets in one night. But he concedes his memory of the event might be a little off. He was only 22 at the time, and maybe a little caught up in the moment.

His first album!


Carla Coots

It was 2005, and Joe Dady had been rushed to the hospital. It was a ruptured aorta of the heart, the situation was dire, the heart of this big-hearted guy was close to bursting. "He claims he had an out-of-body experience, he claims that he started to go to the light, go to the other side," recalls his brother, John Dady. "And he said it was like a Fellini movie…"

As Joe told it:

"Like someone had wrapped a rope around my ankles and was pulling me back down from the chute and I said, 'Let me go, let me go, let me go!'"