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A recent report from the Government Accountability Office says that the International Joint Commission, the agency that helps regulate water levels on Lake Ontario, needs to do a better job of communicating with the public.

The report was issued last week by the GAO, which is a non-partisan watchdog agency that reports to Congress. Its report focused on the way IJC has communicated elements of Plan 2014 than the controversy over the technical aspects of the plan, which regulates water levels on Lake Ontario.

An Ontario climate expert is joining those who say climate change is one of the main reasons behind record water levels in the Great Lakes. The opinion runs contrary to those which have placed the blame on the work of an international commission.


Property owners along the shores of Lake Ontario are dealing with devastating flooding. Soon, many will be faced with decisions related to how much to replant or rebuild.

We discuss the situation on the lakeshore and what it means for future development and home ownership. Our guests: 

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

As Lake Ontario lingers at record highs, public outcry against the group that manages lake levels continues to rise.

Barbara Hasenauer lives on Edgemere Drive in Greece. While picking up sandbags to protect her property from the incessant flooding, she said it’s something she shouldn’t have to do.

"I’m very angry about it," she said. "They can do something, but they don’t. And I don’t mean the people in Greece -- they’ve been great -- but it’s the IJC."

The IJC, or International Joint Commission, is the bi-national group that oversees Great Lakes Management.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

People who live along the south shore of Lake Ontario are still contending with flooding threats, particularly when the wind comes from a northerly direction, but experts say there may be some hopeful signs as we head into the summer.

As of Monday, the Lake Ontario level was at 249.02 feet, exceeding the record of 248.95 feet that was set in 2017.

The International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board says that the water will likely rise gradually over the next several days, but is expected to reach this year’s peak within one to three weeks.