WXXI AM News

Haudenosaunee

We have a conversation with local Native American artists about Indigenous art and about anti-racist education.

Ganondagan's juried Hodinohsoni' Virtual Art Show is now online. It features award-winning paintings, sculptures, beadwork, and traditional artwork.

We talk with the artists about their craft and about a renaissance of Indigenous art. We also address recent anti-racism movements and if Indigenous communities feel included. Our guests:

  • Peter Jemison, historic site manager for Ganondagan
  • Jamie Jacobs, Tonawanda Seneca, Turtle Clan, and Best-in-Show winner
  • Leith Mahkewa, Oneida of the Thames, Wolf Clan, and first place winner in the Beadwork category
  • Natasha Smoke Santiago, Mohawk, Turtle Clan, and second place winner in the Sculpture category

Noelle E. C. Evans | WXXI News

While election results won’t be official until absentee ballots are counted, one local Native American voter says that there is more than partisan politics on the line.

 

Michael Galban is a Native American citizen of the Washoe and Northern Paiute people. He says that while some Indigenous people do not vote in U.S. elections, he did.

rmsc.org

The Rochester Museum and Science Center is thinking ahead to the time when it can reopen.

On Tuesday, it said it plans to open a new exhibit this fall that's inspired by the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, and celebrates the stories of regional innovators.

The exhibit, scheduled to open in October, is called,  The Changemakers: Rochester Women Who Changed the World.

Kathryn Murano Santos is senior director of collections & exhibitions at RMSC.

Noelle E. C. Evans | WXXI News

 

Three prominent U.S. feminists in the 1800s -- Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and Lucretia Mott -- learned what women's equality could look like through personal contact with Native American women.

Historian Sally Roesch Wagner of Syracuse is the author of “Sisters in Spirit,” which chronicles the influence of Haudenosaunee women on early U.S. feminists. 

She says that the three women witnessed the mirror opposite of their own society in Haudenosaunee culture.