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Gov. Andrew Cuomo

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo has finalized his picks to fill two seats on the state Court of Appeals, the highest state court in New York: Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas and Justice Anthony Cannataro, the administrative judge of the New York City Civil Court.

Those nominations will now go before the Judiciary Committee in the state Senate, which will then decide if they’ll get a full vote before the entire chamber. It’s likely that they will. 

New York Now

Republicans in the state Legislature are seeking to ban statewide elected officials in New York from publishing books while they’re in office after it was revealed this week that Gov. Andrew Cuomo is set to earn $5.1 million from his memoir on the pandemic.

They’re hoping to approve legislation that would prevent statewide elected officials and those appointed by the governor from generating income through any published work.

Crown and Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a contract for his latest memoir last year that brought in an initial $3.12 million, with an additional $2 million expected to be paid to him over the next two years, according to his tax returns.

Altogether, Cuomo is set to be paid $5.12 million from his book before taxes and expenses -- far more than the $783,000 he earned for his last book.

Governor Cuomo's office

  

Gov. Andrew Cuomo fueled new controversy Thursday over sexual harassment allegations against him when he sought to redefine the definition of sexual harassment in state law during a question-and-answer session with reporters in the Bronx.

Cuomo is accused of kissing and hugging women without their permission, and in one instance, groping under a female aide’s shirt. He has admitted that he also said things to female staffers, including questions about their dating habits, that might have made them uncomfortable.

Provided

Many people from across the political spectrum have called for Gov. Andrew Cuomo's resignation in light of a series of scandals, including numerous allegations of sexual harassment.

But various groups of Cuomo supporters are organizing and getting more vocal on social media. An East Rochester woman moderates two online groups supporting the embattled governor.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who’s facing allegations of sexual harassment from multiple women, said Thursday that he’s eager to tell his side of the story, but is refraining from doing so out of respect for two ongoing investigations into his alleged behavior.

Karen DeWitt NYS Public Radio

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has come under fire for limiting the media’s access and ability to ask him questions as he faces a number of scandals.

So far, the strategy has delivered some benefits to the embattled governor.

Office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has announced the state will ease COVID-19 restrictions for some venues in the coming weeks.

On Monday, Cuomo said that among the changes that are in the works as the state’s overall COVID positivity numbers improve.

Spectator capacity at large-scale, outdoor event venues, including professional and collegiate sports and live performing arts & entertainment will increase from 20% to 33% beginning May 19. (That increase will coincide with the previously announced increase in large-scale, indoor event venue capacity). 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday denied all allegations of sexual harassment made by multiple women, and predicted that a probe of his actions by the state’s attorney general will find that he did nothing wrong.

In his first in-person session with journalists since December, the governor also defended the way his administration reported the number of nursing home deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic, something that federal prosecutors are looking into.

The governor appeared in Syracuse to announce that the state fair would be held, in a limited capacity, later in the summer.

The leader of the New York State Assembly’s impeachment inquiry gave a brief update Wednesday regarding several investigations into Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Judiciary Committee Chair Charles Lavine said a hotline set up by the committee has generated over 200 tips on probes into sexual harassment allegations made by multiple women; whether Cuomo illegally used staff to help him write and promote a memoir; and if his family and friends got preferential access to coronavirus tests when they were hard to get earlier in the pandemic.

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