WXXI AM News

global warming

Rob Curtis /VIREO

The Audubon Society is out with a study that shows two-thirds of the species of birds in North America are at risk of extinction, with as little of a warmup of 3 degrees Celsius or around 5 degrees Fahrenheit.

WXXI’s Karen DeWitt talked to the group's Ana Paula Tavares about the impending dangers.

freeimages.com/Rob Waterhouse

The global demand for milk and other dairy products is expected to increase more than 50 percent in the next 30 years, but climate change is threatening the dairy industry.

Dairy cows produce less milk and are susceptible to infertility and disease when the weather is warm.

Students from more than 100 countries are holding strikes, protests, and climate-change related events today as part of “Fridays for Future,” a movement that demands world leaders take action on global warming. The movement was initiated by Greta Thunberg, a Swedish teenager who has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Students in the Rochester and Finger Lakes area are participating the in the events. We sit down with some of them to hear their priorities for climate action. In studio:

  • Liam Smith, student at Brighton High School
  • Hridesh Singh, student at Brighton High School and member of the Rochester People’s Climate Coalition
  • Thomas Neumaier, student at the Harley School
  • Tess Begley, student at the Harley School

We continue our series of conversations about statewide efforts to curb climate change. We be joined by Sandra Steingraber, a scientist, climate activist, and scholar at Ithaca College, who recently took her cause and research to Albany.

She’ll be in Rochester this weekend for a program about environmental stewardship with Interfaith Impact of New York State, but first, she joins us on Connections. Our guests:

  • Sandra Steingraber, environmental activist, biologist, and distinguished scholar in residence in the Department of Environmental Studies at Ithaca College
  • Rev. Richard Gilbert, minister emeritus of First Unitarian Church of Rochester, and president of Interfaith Impact of New York State
  • Rev. David Inglis, retired United Church of Christ pastor

There is a discouraging new study about how humans are dealing with climate change. In short, we're getting used to it. And that's dangerous. The study finds that extreme weather can feel "normal" after only a few years, and that normalization could spark apathy regarding climate action. If a past generation thought something was extreme, what happens when the current generation shrugs?

Our panel discusses the implications of this study, and how climate activists plan to push back against normalization. Our guests:

The Green New Deal is getting most of the attention when it comes to legislative ideas for combating climate change. But individual states are working on their own approaches.

New York State is working on a number of policy plans and initiatives, and our guests offer their perspective on what is proposed, what might work, and why. In studio:

  • Sue Hughes-Smith, member of the leadership team for the Rochester People's Climate Coalition
  • Heather Dulisse, Greater Rochester parent leader, and team coordinator for Irondequoit Mothers Out Front
  • Aaron Micheau, president of the Metro Justice Council
  • Andrew Thomas, member of the Rochester chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America's Ecosocialist Working Group, and fundraising and membership director at Metro Justice
  • Mark Dunlea, chair of the Green Education and Legal Fund and one of the initial authors of the Green New Deal

New research coming out of the University of Rochester shows humans are contributing more methane to the environment than scientists previously thought — as much as 25 percent more. Plus, despite what scientists previously thought, the risk of global warming triggering a release of natural methane is low. Researchers say that means reducing the use of fossil fuels could be even more important in the fight against climate change. 

Paleo-climatologist Vas Petrenko led the studies in Antarctica that resulted in these findings. He joins us in studio to discuss the research and how it could influence future environmental policies. Our guests:

  • Vas Petrenko, paleo-climatologist and assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester
  • Peter Neff, postdoctoral associate and member of the Petrenko ice core research group

What are the implications of political leaders banning the terms "climate change" and "global warming?" Multiple reports out of Florida indicate that Governor Rick Scott has instructed state workers to stop using the terms in official state business. So what happens when leaders go beyond disbelief; what happens when they try to ban the terms when it comes to planning, business, the environment, etc? 

We ask our guests:

During this science rountable we talk about climate change, global warming, and how nitrous oxide plays a role in the planet's warming.