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Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Noelle E. C. Evans | WXXI News

 

  

Three prominent U.S. feminists in the 1800s -- Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and Lucretia Mott -- learned what women's equality could look like through personal contact with Native American women.

Historian Sally Roesch Wagner of Syracuse is the author of “Sisters in Spirit,” which chronicles the influence of Haudenosaunee women on early U.S. feminists. 

She says that the three women witnessed the mirror opposite of their own society in Haudenosaunee culture.

Greg Cotterill

About 2,000 people braved bitterly cold temperatures and snow for a rally and march in Seneca Falls on Saturday.

The event was part of three days of activities designed to “inspire all Americans to take an active role in democracy," encourage eligible voters to get out the vote and honor the legacy of women in leadership.

Thousands gathered in cities across the country Saturday as part of the nationwide Women's March rallies that focused on issues such as climate change, pay equity, reproductive rights and immigration. 

Among the hundreds of shows in the KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival lineup this week is one called, "Suffragettes Unite!"

The performer is jazz singer Ann Mitchell. She doesn't sing in this show, but speaks the words delivered by suffrage leaders Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other women, including Sarah C. Owen.

"She was just another woman, like you or myself, that was at the convention,” Mitchell said. “She was part of the movement."

Beth Adams/WXXI News

The newest in the fleet of tugboats on the Erie Canal was christened Friday in honor of women’s suffrage leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

In the 19th century, the canal was like the interstate highway of the day. It was frequently the path traveled between Seneca Falls and Rochester as Cady Stanton and her fellow suffragists coordinated their campaign for women’s rights.

At Friday morning's dedication at Corn Hill Landing in Rochester, Cady Stanton's great-great-granddaughter, Coline Jenkins, said tugboats are a metaphor for the life's work of her historic ancestor.

SENECA FALLS (AP) The Women's Rights National Historical Park is throwing a party to celebrate the bicentennial of the birthday of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

The women's rights pioneer and abolitionist was born 200 years ago this past Thursday in Johnstown in New York's Mohawk Valley. She was an early leader of America's suffragist movement, working closely with another New Yorker, Susan B. Anthony.

Stanton and her husband settled in Seneca Falls in the Finger Lakes region, where she helped organize the first women's rights convention in 1848.