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Randy Gorbman / WXXI News

(P-A Announcer says: “Let’s welcome back to Rochester, ‘Recycleman’...(crowd cheers))

Recycleman, or as his birth certificate probably says, Ogden Whitehead, was wearing his traditional green cape and promoting, of course, recycling. He is a former employee of both the Rochester Red Wings and RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, and he was among those taking part in the pre-game festivities for Deaf Culture Day. He used to lead the Frontier Field fans in cheers so it seemed fitting to bring him back for this promotion.

Gerry Buckley, president of NTID, also took part in the ceremonies and said what the Red Wings have done, including using American Sign Language to perform “Take me out to the ballgame” in a segment that was featured on ESPN this past weekend, really means a lot.

We preview a historic production of the August Wilson play, “Fences,” in Rochester. Members of the cast and crew of NTID’s production join us to discuss the first ever Deaf, black performance of “Fences,” which will be accessible to both Deaf and hearing audiences.

WXXI News streamed this conversation on Facebook Live with captions. To view the video, click here. In studio:

  • Aceyon Owens, speaker for the role of Troy
  • Marqwan Holmes, signer for the role of Troy
  • Malik Paris, signer for the role of Lyons
  • Giigii Gano, speaker for the role of Rose
  • Luane Haggerty, director of “Fences” and interpreter
  • Danica Zielinski, interpreter

This story is reported from WXXI’s Inclusion Desk

Marty Kaufman and Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

 

Sarah Latchney is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She studies environmental toxicology. She’s also deaf.

Latchney learned early on that deaf students have to work exceptionally hard to get the same recognition as their colleagues who can hear.  

Artist Laural Hartman recently invited WXXI into her studio. As we know with art, there’s generally a deeper meaning behind a painting, drawing or sculpture. With Hartman’s work, we’re awakened to a life experience with several layers - some of which resonate with many of us and others we’ve never encountered until now.

Hartman, also a faculty member at RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf joins Tabitha Jacques, Director of the Joseph F. and Helen C. Dyer Arts Center at RIT to explain what mainstream museums may not understand about the specialty of deaf art.

The repeal of the Affordable Care Act could have some unintended consequences on the most vulnerable: children with disabilities. On this special Move to Include edition of Need to Know we’ll learn how special education in our public schools may see unbearable funding cuts.

Also on the show, some local disability rights advocates were recently detained outside the White House. We’ll discuss what they’re calling on President Trump to do and if he’s responded.

And a complex journey for a local artist unfolds on canvas. How local talent is awakening our understanding of deaf culture through art.

Move to Include and the Inclusion Desk is a partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation designed to promote inclusion for people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

It's well known that Rochester is home to a large Deaf and hard of hearing community. While the community is large, the job prospects are not. "Need to Know Rochester" takes a look at what the Rochester business community can do to help keep our Deaf and hard of hearing talent here.

Turning Around Rochester's Deaf Student Exodus

Jan 24, 2013

This week's "Need To Know Rochester" looks at how the slow economic recovery is affecting Rochester's Deaf and hard of hearing students, prompting them to leave Rochester to look for work.