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common ground health

National Park Service

Common Ground Health, a Rochester nonprofit, has begun a study to understand who is using the local portion of the Erie Canalway Trail and how to make that group more diverse.

Benjamin Woelk, who’s running the study for Common Ground Health, said he suspects that current trail users are largely white and have above-average incomes, even though the trail runs right past some of Rochester’s poorest ZIP codes.

Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

“We asked questions that no one else was asking,” Common Ground Health CEO Wade Norwood said of a report his organization released Monday.

“Folks were honest with us in a way we did not expect,” he said.

The results of the survey provide the strongest evidence yet of a link between poverty and poor health outcomes in the Finger Lakes, Norwood said.

Max Schulte / WXXI News

A new route between The Strong Museum of Play and the Central Library officially opened in Rochester on Thursday.

The sidewalks are sprinkled with blue and yellow dots. There’s a new foosball table at the library. (“I just happen to love foosball,” City Council parks and public works committee chair Mitch Gruber said at a news conference to mark the opening.)

There’s a large Connect Four game at a bus stop on Court Street, and there are musical instruments open to the public at Martin Luther King Jr. Park.

Brett Dahlberg / WXXI News

Transportation planners and advocates from around the Rochester region said they were leaving the city with some new ideas about planning for pedestrians after a so-called “walk audit” through downtown.

Mark Fenton led the audit at the invitation of Common Ground Health, a Rochester nonprofit organization. Fenton is a Brockport native and an adjunct professor at Tufts University in Boston.

“Going for a walk is a lot different than looking at drawings and talking about things theoretically,” Fenton said.