WXXI AM News

Climate Change

New York Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) said his position on climate change is "evolving." The Republican representative recently signed onto a resolution that acknowledges a human role in causing climate change related to erratic and damaging weather patterns. That's a reversal from his 2014 campaign when he said it was unclear if human activities had any influence.

What is it that climate can't change? That’s the subject of a new documentary produced by the filmmaker of Gasland. We talk to Josh Fox about his film, How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things Climate Can't Change, and what it is deep within us that climate change can’t destroy. The film will be screened at The Little Theatre on Saturday as part of the One Take Documentary series. Our guests:

Donald Trump recently said that he doesn't think there is a real drought in California. That came as a surprise to scientists, who have been tracking the water crisis out west for a while now.

Our Monthly Science Roundtable digs in to the science of the drought: how closely tied to climate change is it? And how does it impact us in western New York? Our guests:

  • Josh Goldowitz, professor and undergraduate coordinator for the Environmental Sustainability Health & Safety BS Degree Program in the College of Applied Science & Technology at RIT
  • Matthew Hoffman, assistant professor in the School of Mathematical Sciences at RIT
  • John Stella, associate professor in the Department of Forest and Natural Resources Management, SUNY-ESF
  • Craig Miller, senior editor of Climate Watch at KQED

Nazareth College is getting ready to host perhaps the first ever conference on the intersection of faith and the fight against climate change. The conference is called Sacred Texts and Human Contexts: Nature and Environment in World Religions.

How does faith guide our approach to climate change? Is environmentalism a religious value? Our panel discusses it:

  • Thomas Donlin-Smith, professor of religious studies at Nazareth College
  • Etin Anwar, chair of religious studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges
  • Nancy Rourke, director of the Catholic Studies program at Canisius College
  • Nathan Kollar, co-founder of the Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies at Dialogue

Are environmental groups denying the real leading cause of the destruction of the planet? The makers of the film Cowspiracy say yes.

The local chapter of the Sierra Club is bringing in filmmaker Keegan Kuhn of Cowspiracy to talk about the role of animal agriculture in climate change. We talk to Kuhn, and we hear from others who are participating in a local event to focus on food, access, cost, and more. Our guests:

  • Keegan Kuhn, filmmaker
  • Peter Debes, chair of the Rochester Regional Group of the Sierra Club
  • Carly Fox, worker rights advocate

We've heard it said many times that we need to eventually get off fossil fuels. There is growing urgency about that, but there's usually a lot less emphasis on one important word: how?

The Greater Rochester section of the National Council of Jewish Women is hosting an event this week titled, "Repairing the Planet, Starting in the Flower City." Representatives join us in studio to discuss the goals, and we hear from the Rochester People's Climate Coalition about related issues coming up later this month. Our guests:

  • Arlene Schenker, past president and current board member of the National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Rochester section
  • Mark Dunlea, executive director of the Green Education and Legal Fund
  • Linda Isaacson Fedele, Rochester People's Climate Coalition

Why are high schools so ineffective at teaching climate change? A new survey in the journal Science found that teachers spent very little time on climate change in the classroom. Many teachers say they don't feel trained well enough to teach it. Others might feel pressure because the issue has become politicized.

So, how should it be taught? Our panel has experience with that question. Our guests:

If we're going to try to slow climate change, or mitigate its effects, what are our options?

On Monday, February 22 at 7 p.m., the local chapter of the League of Women Voters will host a panel on New York State's legislative approaches to fight climate change. Right now, there are four different policy approaches under consideration by the New York State legislature. From a carbon tax to requiring clean energy, our panel explains the four bills that could still pass this year. In studio:

Will the UN climate deal, recently struck in Paris, be effective? We talk with two people who were in Paris during the negotiations, and a local climate change activist. Did they get what they were looking for? What will it mean for us? Our guests:

The UN Climate Change Conference in Paris is fast approaching, and the world is watching for the results. Will the talks produce something meaningful? Will nations around the world follow any new guidelines for slowing climate change?

Several organizations are uniting to launch the Rochester March for Global Climate Action. We meet some of the organizers and talk about what they're hoping for in Paris. Our guests:

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