WXXI AM News

Climate Change

Why are high schools so ineffective at teaching climate change? A new survey in the journal Science found that teachers spent very little time on climate change in the classroom. Many teachers say they don't feel trained well enough to teach it. Others might feel pressure because the issue has become politicized.

So, how should it be taught? Our panel has experience with that question. Our guests:

If we're going to try to slow climate change, or mitigate its effects, what are our options?

On Monday, February 22 at 7 p.m., the local chapter of the League of Women Voters will host a panel on New York State's legislative approaches to fight climate change. Right now, there are four different policy approaches under consideration by the New York State legislature. From a carbon tax to requiring clean energy, our panel explains the four bills that could still pass this year. In studio:

Will the UN climate deal, recently struck in Paris, be effective? We talk with two people who were in Paris during the negotiations, and a local climate change activist. Did they get what they were looking for? What will it mean for us? Our guests:

The UN Climate Change Conference in Paris is fast approaching, and the world is watching for the results. Will the talks produce something meaningful? Will nations around the world follow any new guidelines for slowing climate change?

Several organizations are uniting to launch the Rochester March for Global Climate Action. We meet some of the organizers and talk about what they're hoping for in Paris. Our guests:

In our Monthly Science Roundtable, we look at climate change and global cooling...3.6 million years ago.

How did the northern hemisphere, which didn't have much ice four million years ago, end up with continental ice sheets by roughly 2.7 million years ago? There are a number of ideas that could explain the global cooling. The National Science Foundation recently awarded $4.24 million to two University of Rochester researchers to launch a joint U.S.-China research project studying the role of CO2 in reverse global warming.

We'll also explore why researchers now believe our magnetic field is 500 million years older than previously thought. What does that mean for sustaining life and what might that mean for life on Mars? Our guests:

  • Carmala Garzione, professor and chair of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester
  • John Tarduno, professor and director of undergraduate programs in geosciences, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester

Pope's Speech Inspires Rochester Rally

Sep 23, 2015
uswateralliance.org

Pope Francis has many people in Rochester and across the country excited about his teaching. That’s how Nancy Rourke feels. She is a parishioner at Blessed Sacrament Church and a moral theologian at Canisus College.

"Think about the way that he approaches issues and see how everything is all connected together, and just to enjoy the excitement and the euphoria of all the people who are happy to have him here."

This week's been labeled a "Week of Moral Action on Climate" to coincide with Thursday’s address on climate change to Congress by the Pope.

NASA has sent man to the moon, a rover to Mars, and a probe to Pluto. Their work is often celebrated as heroic, and it requires remarkable precision to pull it off. Why, then, do some Americans view NASA as heroic... except the agency's work on climate change?

For some Americans, NASA is suddenly a fraud when they start talking about climate. We'll sit down with an astrophysicist who has had a particularly close-up view of the public conversation on climate change. Adam Frank now writes for NPR's national science blog, and he wants the public to catch up the scientific community. He'll explain why climate science should be celebrated as one of man's great achievements - the kind that just might save our civilization.

Is climate change a local issue when it comes to elections? Typically, we talk about climate change policy on the national level. But a growing list of local communities are adopting policies in regards to climate change. This week, Rochester's People's Climate Coalition is sponsoring a candidate forum with a focus on building a "sustainable economy." What exactly does that mean? We ask our guests:

Major religions are trying to come together to address ecological issues, and a number of upcoming events in the Rochester area will target people of various faiths to respond to climate change. We'll talk to representatives of the Christian, Jewish, and Islamic faiths about how their religious beliefs tie in to climate action:

  • Nancy Rourke
  • Neely Kelley
  • Joyce Herman
  • Dr. Ron Wexler
  • Joseph Lombardi

We examine the meaning of Pope Francis' new encyclical on climate change. What does it mean for the Catholic Church? More broadly, what does it mean when an organized religion wades into climate issues? Our panel discusses that and more:

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