WXXI AM News

climate

President Trump has been critical of wind energy in recent weeks. We focus on wind as a component of New York State’s energy future, and the energy future of the country. Our guests:

  • Eric Hittinger, assistant professor of public policy at the College of Liberal Arts, and faculty member at the Golisano Institute for Sustainability at RIT
  • Neely Kelly, senior organizer for Mothers Out Front New York
  • Zack Dufresne, director of member services and clean energy advocate for the Alliance for Clean Energy New York

We often hear about the science and research behind climate change, but an upcoming event in Rochester will focus on how people in our community are personally impacted by global warming.

During the Rise for a Resilient Rochester event, area residents will share personal stories of climate change impacts and solutions with city, state, and federal leaders.

We get a preview of the event this hour with our guests: 

  • David Alicea, New York lead organizer of the Sierra Club
  • Hridesh Singh, student at Brighton High School and director of communications for the Climate Club
  • Erika Jones, systems advocate at the Center for Disability Rights

Astrophysicist Adam Frank joins a panel of climate activists and concerned citizens who respond to his book and its themes. In studio:

We sit down with a panel of conservatives who are concerned about climate change. Our panelists are people who describe themselves as being on the right side of the political spectrum. The stereotype is that progressives care about climate change; conservatives deny it. That's not true of our guests, but that doesn’t mean the solutions are easy, or easily agreed upon.

They share their ideas for what kinds of policies and ideas make sense regarding climate and conservatism. Our guests:

Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe recently wrote that ending America's oil addiction will be a lot harder than many people think. Our panel discusses the practical challenges and possible solutions to creating a national infrastructure without oil.

In studio:

We talk to Rochester Youth Climate Leaders about their recent Earth Day Summit. The students join us to share what they learned, what they hope to achieve with local environmental efforts, and their climate priorities.

In studio:

  • Linden Burack, 8th grade student at School of the Arts and Rochester Youth Climate Leader
  • Benny Smith, 11th grade student at Brighton High School and Rochester Youth Climate Leader
  • Hridesh Singh, 10th grade student at Brighton High School and Rochester Youth Climate Leader
  • Terry Smith, head of the Harley School’s Lower School
  • Cassidy Putney, co-founder and director of sustainability and communications for Impact Earth
  • Evan Zachary, director of Flower City Pickers

On January 23, the Trump administration imposed a 30 percent tariff on solar cells and modules made abroad. President Trumps says the move will increase U.S. manufacturing of solar equipment and create jobs. Since the tariff was imposed, one Chinese solar company has announced it will build a plant in Florida. While plans for the plant were in the works prior to the Trump administration's announcement, the company said it "continues to closely monitor treatment of imports of solar cells and modules under the U.S. trade laws."

Some say this is an early victory under the tariff, but critics say the move will harm the solar industry in the U.S. According to research conducted by Greentech Media, the tariff could result in an 11 percent decrease of installations over the next four years, and lead to tens of thousands of job losses.

Our guests weigh in on the issue and answer your questions about solar. In studio:

One year into the Trump presidency, climate activists are taking their efforts to the statewide level. So what are their priorities for New York State in 2018? Here’s one idea: In New York, activists and advocates say that many of the vital technologies – the ones that would update and improve our outdated energy grid – can not be deployed at a meaningful scale. How can we change that? Our guest:

A fresh look at LED lighting challenges ideas as to whether it’s better for the environment. A recent piece published by Gizmodo argues that the benefits of LED lighting – energy efficiency and reduced costs – could lead to more lighting overall. It’s called the rebound effect, and there’s disagreement over the impact it may have. Some scientists say that concerns about the rebound effect are overblown. They argue that more efficient technology reduces threats to the environment; so, even if the world is getting brighter, it’s become brighter using less energy.

We break down the facts, and look at common household items and their impact on climate. Our guests:

What can we do on a daily basis to help mitigate the effects of climate change? That's the focus of the upcoming New York Climate Solutions Summit.

We discuss a number of solutions and how to implement them, including using electric vehicles, clean energy, and more. Our guests:

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