WXXI AM News

China

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When WXXI News spoke with Rebecca Kanthor in late January, it was in the initial phases of the outbreak. She and her family were isolating themselves, especially because they had passed through Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak in China.

But the situation has greatly eased now in that country, in terms of the number of reported cases. Still, Kanthor describes the situation as a “new normal” for people living in China.

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When WXXI News spoke with Kanthor in late January, it was in the initial phases of the outbreak. She and her family were isolating themselves, especially because they had passed through Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak in China.

But the situation has greatly eased now in that country, in terms of the number of reported cases. Still, Kanthor describes the situation as a “new normal” for people living in China.

We sit down with students from the University of Rochester who discuss recent controversies on campus related to China. The Hong Kong protests, the status of Taiwan and Tibet, democracy, and human rights were all at the subject of debates among different student groups. We explore the issues.

In studio:

  • Efua Agyare-Kumi, third-year student at the University of Rochester and contributing writer to CITY Newspaper
  • Sampson Hao, president of the Chinese Students’ Association at the University of Rochester
  • Selina Xu, president of the Hong Kong Students Association at the University of Rochester
  • Matthew Burns, dean of students at the University of Rochester

The world seems to be on a knife's edge in so many regions, and American relationships are vital.

We welcome a semi-regular guest to discuss his latest work in understanding world events and geopolitics in Russia, China, and more. We also discuss the Iran crisis. In studio:

  • Randy Stone, director of the Skalny Center for Polish and Central European Studies at the University of Rochester

UR becomes battleground in China, Hong Kong conflict

Dec 4, 2019
Max Schulte / WXXI News

The dozens of students who gathered in a stretch of the University of Rochester's elaborate tunnel system on a recent Sunday night wore all black, save for the blue surgical masks over their mouths.

They were in battle fatigues for the latest salvo in a series of conflicts on campus that had been simmering for months over opposing views on all things China – the Hong Kong protests, the status of Taiwan and Tibet, democracy, and human rights.