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Childcare Subsidies

The Children’s Agenda recently released a new report that shows there’s a growing shortage of affordable and available child care services, both locally and nationally. According to the report, Rochester has seen improvements in the availability of child care for children in pre-K, but options for infants and toddlers are increasingly difficult to find. The Children’s Agenda is calling on local, state, and federal partners to invest more in the child care system and in providers.

This hour, we discuss the report and The Children’s Agenda’s priorities. We also hear from providers and from parents who share the challenges they’ve faced finding child care. In studio:

Over the past 15 years, the number of Monroe County children benefiting from child care subsidies has fallen substantially. Today, we take a look at what that means from a business standpoint. It might seem crude, but it turns out there's a direct relationship between child care funding and the success of the local business community.

That subject is the specialty of Rob Grunewald, an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. He's in Rochester as a guest speaker, and he's one of our guests on Connections:

freeimages.com/Anissa Thompson

Members of a coalition of local community and faith-based groups will be staging a rally outside the Monroe County Office Building this evening.

They're calling on all three candidates for county executive to pledge to double of the number of children who receive child care assistance.

From Work to Welfare? The Cut To Childcare Subsidies

Dec 5, 2013
Associated Press

Some Monroe County families could soon go from work to welfare. That’s according to Furnessa Mangrum, Executive Director of the Jefferson Avenue Childhood Development Center.

Her comments come in response to County Executive Maggie Brooks’ latest budget proposal which calls for a $1.3 million cut in childcare subsidies. The subsidies help low-income working families off-set the cost of day care.

Mangrum says the funding cut means a ripple-effect is inevitable.