WXXI AM News

Center for Youth

Fashion Week of Rochester is back, and we preview next month's events with organizers and designers. The annual event benefits homeless children and teens at the Center for Youth. We talk about Fashion Week’s impact and a new clothing collection named for the late Louise Slaughter. In studio:

  • Elaine Spaull, executive director of the Center for Youth, and member of Rochester City Council
  • Jeffrey Diduch, vice president of technical design at Hickey Freeman
  • Robin Slaughter Minerva, daughter of Louise Slaughter
  • Barbara Rivera, advocate for the Center for Youth
  • Meg Mundy, chief fashion organizer for Fashion Week of Rochester
  • Porshia Diaz, local designer

There’s a “perfect storm” threatening young, homeless people, according to a member of Rochester City Council. Elaine Spaull has decided not to seek reelection, and part of her decision stems from a desire to help young parents facing homelessness. As the executive director of the Center for Youth, Spaull says she sees young people struggle to find shelter and other resources in an environment where agencies are closing their programs or facing financial challenges. Her dream is to establish “extended host homes,” where community members will offer their love, support, and their homes to young parents who want to stay with their children in times of crisis.

This hour, we discuss the program's goals, and we talk about the critical needs of youth in our community. In studio:

  • Elaine Spaull, executive director of the Center for Youth, and member of Rochester City Council
  • Faith Davignon, assistant director of the Runaway Homeless Continuum at the Center for Youth
  • Sara Volz-Rogers, assistant director of the Runaway Homeless Continuum at the Center for Youth
  • Ma’liyah Davis, advocate on the Street Outreach Team at the Center for Youth

Fashion Week of Rochester is back. Sponsored by the Center for Youth, the annual event celebrates national and local designers while raising awareness of the challenges faced by homeless youth and young people who are at risk for homelessness and human trafficking.

We sit down with Fashion Week organizers and participants to discuss what’s on tap for this year’s event, and how they hope their efforts will help vulnerable populations in our community. In studio:

  • Elaine Spaull, executive director of the Center for Youth, and member of Rochester City Council
  • Joan Lincoln, originator of Fashion Week of Rochester, and owner of Panache
  • Christopher Washington, emerging designer, and Lead the Way role Model
  • Iman Abid, board member for the Center for Youth, Lead the Way role model, and chapter director of the Genesee Valley Region of the ACLU

Fashion Week of Rochester kicks off in October, and in one sense, it's a great opportunity to have some fun with creative ideas and fashion in different settings. But there's more to Fashion Week than runways and models. It goes back to 2010 -- the year the event began -- when organizers used it as a vehicle to raise funds and awareness for homeless youth and adults in crisis in Rochester.

We talk about services provided by he Center for Youth, including the Crisis Nursery, and we'll preview the lineup for Fashion Week. In studio:

  • Elaine Spaull, executive director of the Center for Youth
  • Meghan Mundy, chief fashion organizer for Fashion Week of Rochester
  • Sarah Vitberg, mother
  • Effie Youme, fashion designer and Ivory Coast native

Fashion Week is coming back to Rochester, but the event is about more than just fashion. We talk about the ways the event helps people in need in our community, and we share some remarkable stories from our guests, who come from a range of backgrounds. In studio:

After focusing recently on single mothers, we turn our attention to young children in crisis. Our guests from the Crisis Nursery explain how they're keeping children safe when caregivers are in crisis -- poverty, no daycare, housing issues, no healthcare coverage.

The Crisis Nursery provides free, temporary childcare during family emergencies. The long-term goal is to prevent abuse, neglect, or homelessness. In other words: kids are in trouble, and the Crisis Nursery aims to prevent trauma, or make sure kids are not exposed to it. We examine its mission with: