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Arts & Life

Carla Coots

It was 2005, and Joe Dady had been rushed to the hospital. It was a ruptured aorta of the heart, the situation was dire, the heart of this big-hearted guy was close to bursting. "He claims he had an out-of-body experience, he claims that he started to go to the light, go to the other side," recalls his brother, John Dady. "And he said it was like a Fellini movie…"

As Joe told it:

"Like someone had wrapped a rope around my ankles and was pulling me back down from the chute and I said, 'Let me go, let me go, let me go!'"

PBS.ORG

Native Americans have played an important role in the U.S. military.  Tonight, a documentary that pays tribute to their stories premieres at 9 o'clock on WXXI-TV.


Courtesy of the University of Rochester

Jeff Beal can put his feet up and relax Friday night at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater. “I have nothing to do,” he says.

Yes, that’s the job of the Eastman Philharmonia, conductor laureate of the St. Louis and Detroit symphony orchestras Leonard Slatkin, and Grammy-winning soprano Hila Plitmann. It’s a celebration of Beal’s Emmy-encrusted career as a composer of film scores, television themes and classical compositions.

Missing Piece Group

Black Violin is not a Frankenstein creation, where we can see all of the parts stitched together, the bolts sticking out of the neck, the lumbering gait. “We approach the performance like rappers, but the music is approached sort of like Beethoven,” says Kev Marcus.

Black Violin. Kev Marcus on violin, Wil B on viola. Plus a DJ and drums. On Thursday, they’re bringing this surprising fusion of classical and hip-hop to Kodak Center, 200 W. Ridge Road.

The band’s new album, “Take the Stairs,” was released earlier this week.

Kings of the mountain

Nov 6, 2019
Ryan Williamson / CITY Newspaper

King Buffalo's music is big, bold, and beautiful. The band looms, aggressively atmospheric, treading some trippy air in the process; meticulously constructed sounds grow before your very ears. It envelops. It is epic.

Ralph Meranto

A new play premiering in Rochester this weekend tackles the issue of race relations.

"I just think it's something we don't about in the world," said Ralph Meranto, artistic director at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Rochester. "We all have friends of all different races, and there's always this awkwardness when you get to that point of the conversation."

Fleming Artists

It was the early 1980s and Christine Lavin's longtime boyfriend, a lawyer, told her a special guest would be joining them for dinner at a Manhattan restaurant. "But he wouldn't tell me who, because he figured I wouldn’t show up," Lavin says.

MAG's Mucha exhibit deeper than decorative arts

Oct 30, 2019
Provided

Whenever museums or galleries host large-scale exhibitions of work by household-name master artists, they're faced with the challenge of making the show into more than a dazzling display of familiar beauty. Sure, the draw of seeing works created by the actual hands of immortalized artists is enough to pull the public through the doors, but that's not enough for the delightful nerds who become curators, nor many of the delightful nerds in the audience.

Provided by High Falls Women's Film Festival

The High Falls Women’s Film Festival pulls no punches when it opens Thursday at The Little Theatre. When the first film, “We Are Not Princesses,” lights up the screen, a woman who has fled her native Syria matter-of-factly describes wild dogs feeding on dead bodies in the streets.

Craig Blankenhorn/HBO

Michelle Wolf certainly has a way with words. Whether those words are truth-telling or rabble-rousing depends on the listener’s perspective. But it was certainly both sides of that argument, after her appearance at the 2018 White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner, that catapulted her into the upper realm of talked-about comedians.

Wolf has two shows here Saturday, 7 and 9:30 p.m., at Comedy at the Carlson.

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