WXXI AM News

Art

We have a conversation with local Native American artists about Indigenous art and about anti-racist education.

Ganondagan's juried Hodinohsoni' Virtual Art Show is now online. It features award-winning paintings, sculptures, beadwork, and traditional artwork.

We talk with the artists about their craft and about a renaissance of Indigenous art. We also address recent anti-racism movements and if Indigenous communities feel included. Our guests:

  • Peter Jemison, historic site manager for Ganondagan
  • Jamie Jacobs, Tonawanda Seneca, Turtle Clan, and Best-in-Show winner
  • Leith Mahkewa, Oneida of the Thames, Wolf Clan, and first place winner in the Beadwork category
  • Natasha Smoke Santiago, Mohawk, Turtle Clan, and second place winner in the Sculpture category

The Memorial Art Gallery has a new director of academic programs. Dr. Nile Blunt brings his national and international experience in museum and arts education to Rochester's students. He began his position in late September. We talk to him about his goals for art education in Rochester.

We also discuss how the MAG has adapted to the pandemic with director Jonathan Binstock.

Our guests:

  • Jonathan Binstock, Ph.D., Mary W. and Donald R. Clark Director of the Memorial Art Gallery
  • Nile Blunt, Ph.D., McPherson Director of Academic Programs at the Memorial Art Gallery
  • Robert Snyder, Ed.D., assistant principal at Mary McLeod Bethune School #45

A new exhibition at Rochester Contemporary Art Center explores society's grappling with the post-truth era. "Trust, but verify" addresses how so-called "fake news" is affecting our present and could impact our future.

We talk to some of the artists behind the project about their work and what they hope viewers learn from it. Our guests:

A new project called “In This Moment” is highlighting Black leaders, writers, and photographers in our community. The work will result in a series of chat books, where essays and photos tell the remarkable stories of local leaders – stories the project’s organizers say are historically undervalued.

We talk to the team behind “In This Moment” about their work, their goals for the series of books, and the value of highlighting Black voices through art. Our guests:

A number of local artists have said they've seen changes and setbacks in their work as a result of the pandemic. This hour, we talk with members of Rochester's arts community about how they are adapting during the crisis, and how a possible reopening will impact their work.

This episode will primarily feature visual artists. It's one in a series of similar conversations we'll have on the program. Our guests:

Britton Bradford is a local artist and a talented basketball player. Growing up as an African American youth, he thought his only options for career success were as a rapper or as a professional athlete. But now, he's a successful artist and says he wishes he had known there were other opportunities available to him.

Christopher Washington is a local designer with a similar story. He found success in the fashion scene after thinking basketball was his only path to the professional world.

Both men join us to share their stories and to discuss how to change the culture of expectations for African American youth. In studio:

An exhibit set to open Friday at the Visual Studies Workshop is exploring perceptions of Black masculinity and gender identity.

We talk with artist Joshua Rashaad McFadden about “Evidence,” and our guests discuss what it means to be a Black man in America today. In studio:

  • Joshua Rashaad McFadden, visual artist
  • Gatekeeper Adrian, artist, activist, photographer, filmmaker, organizer, and founder and chair of Rochester Black Pride
  • Jonathan Ntheketha, performance educator with Impact Interactive
  • Brandon Stroud, yoga instructor, and residence coordinator at RIT

When service members leave active duty for civilian life, they may face challenges. Female veterans report that they have specific hurdles that are hard to overcome — including a lack of social support.

We sit down with several female veterans who share their stories, and a new project they worked on called Eyes Front. It’s a photography and writing collaboration where they’ve documented their experiences. We talk to them about what they want the community to know. In studio:

  • Jennifer Wiese, veteran, social worker at the Rochester Vet Center, and participant in the Eyes Front program
  • Jade Starr, veteran and participant in the Eyes Front program
  • Megan Charland, director of photography and digital arts at Flower City Arts Center

We have a conversation about art, artists’ intentions, and how audiences perceive art. Earlier this summer, the Rochester-based band Joywave released a new song and music video that has generated conversation. “Like a Kennedy” features lead singer Daniel Armbruster playing former President John F. Kennedy on the day of his assassination. The song and the video have a tone and a message – both of which Armbruster addressed in advance of possible criticism. On YouTube, he wrote that the video is absolutely hard to watch and that it’s supposed to be.

We’ve invited a number of people to watch the video and record their thoughts. We share those reactions this hour, and our in-studio panel discusses the video, its message, and the message they think Joywave means to send. In studio:

As the world watches France attempt to rebuild Notre Dame, experts tell us that there are historical parallels. Katherine Clark Walter, from the College at Brockport, says, “The major Gothic cathedrals of Europe were often born of renovations necessitated by devastating fires just such as this one and their renovation often foregrounded the relics these churches held as key to their spirituality and identity, so there is a fascinating meeting of past and present as the whole world now watches to see what survived from Notre Dame.”

We talk about the meaning of those relics, the process of rebuilding, and more. Our guests:

  • Katherine Clark Walter, associate professor in the Department of History at The College at Brockport
  • Jean Pedersen, associate professor in the Department of Humanities at the Eastman School
  • Sarah Thompson, associate professor of art history at RIT

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