WXXI AM News

Coming Up On Connections: Wednesday, October 12th

Oct 12, 2016

First hour: Rape culture and the impact of Donald Trump's boasts of sexual assault

Second hour: Celebrating the bicentennial of the 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse

Surrogates of Donald Trump have broadened their explanations for why Trump's boasts of sexual assault are not a big deal. Ben Carson lectured a CNN anchor that maybe SHE is the problem, because she hasn't heard men talk like that. And former New York State Lieutenant Governor Betsy McAughey said that rap music has worse lyrics, so can't we focus on that? Our panel will discuss the impact of a presidential candidate who assesses women almost entirely on looks, and seems to assume that his power gives him the right to treat them as he pleases. In studio:

  • Dr. M. Elizabeth Thorpe, assistant professor of communications at the College at Brockport
  • Erin-Kate Howard, equality activist
  • Lucas Sienk, facilitator in RESOLVE's Stand Up Guys program
  • John Cole, vice president of outreach for the University of Rochester's student organization, Men Opposing Violence Everywhere

There is a building in Farmington that lost a wall during a windstorm in 2006, and maybe that seemed like no big deal; after all, the building looked old and decrepit. But this was a historic building, the home for debates and discussions on some of the most important subjects in American history: abolition of slavery, women's suffrage, rights for Native Americans. It's called the 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse, which is celebrating its bicentennial on October 22 and 23. Our discussion focuses on the history, the role of the meetinghouse in advancing equality, and the upcoming events. In studio:

  • Dr. Judith Wellman, professor emerita of history at SUNY Oswego and former coordinator of Meetinghouse restoration
  • Lyle Jenks, president of the 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse organization
  • Veronica (Ronnie) Reitter, park supervisor/interpreter for Ganondagan State Historic Site
  • Meg Joseph, executive director, Friends of Ganondagan