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Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a political correspondent for NPR. He covers the 2020 presidential campaign and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015. He reported on the 2016 presidential election, then worked for two years as a congressional correspondent before shifting his focus back to the campaign trail.

Before that, he worked as a statehouse reporter in both Pennsylvania and California, for member stations WITF and KQED. He also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, and also has a master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

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And the campaigns are over, the rallies have ended, and it is officially Election Day. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump crisscrossed the country deep into the night, seizing every last opportunity to get out the vote.

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It is hard to keep track of all the ways that today's election could make history.

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Hillary Clinton, if she wins, would come to be the first female president.

After a weekend where Indiana Gov. Mike Pence strongly rebuked running mate Donald Trump and refused to campaign for him — and after a debate where Trump undercut a Pence policy proposal on Syria — Pence made the cable news rounds Monday morning to praise Trump.

Hillary Clinton channeled a little bit of Donald Trump in San Diego on Thursday afternoon, delivering a blistering attack on her likely Republican opponent's qualifications to run the country.

"Making Donald Trump our commander in chief would be a historic mistake," Clinton told a cheering, and at times laughing, audience.

On the way into the Colorado Republican Party's state convention in Colorado Springs Saturday morning, a Ted Cruz supporter waved a big broom with the letters "CRUZ" fastened to the top.

The convention took place in a hockey arena, and the prop is probably familiar to most sports fans. The Cruz supporter was looking for a sweep, and a sweep was what he got.

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won clear, early and decisive victories in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Trump beat the GOP field by double digits. He got 35 percent of the vote, well ahead of surprise second-place finisher John Kasich, who pulled in 16 percent. Kasich was followed by Ted Cruz at 12 percent, Jeb Bush at 11 percent and Marco Rubio, who, after a poor debate performance Saturday, faded to fifth just shy of 11 percent.

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