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Richard Gonzales

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET Thursday

Officials in Philadelphia are praising city law enforcement for peacefully resolving a chaotic episode Wednesday night in which a gunman armed with an AR-15 and a handgun fired off more than 100 rounds, hitting six police officers, then barricaded himself inside a residence, creating a more than seven-hour standoff.

The suspect is now in custody and all six wounded officers have been released from local hospitals.

The Federal Aviation Administration has banned certain MacBook Pro laptops on flights following an announcement by Apple Inc. that some use batteries that pose a fire or safety risk.

"The FAA is aware of the recalled batteries that are used in some Apple MacBook Pro laptops. In early July, we alerted airlines about the recall, and we informed the public," the FAA said in an emailed statement.

The Justice Department late last week moved to seek the decertification of the union representing hundreds of U.S. immigration judges, ratcheting up a simmering battle over the Trump administration's immigration enforcement policies.

Updated at 10:22 p.m. ET

In a shake-up of the top ranks of U.S. national intelligence, President Trump announced Thursday that he will name Joseph Maguire, the current Director of the National Counterterrorism Center, as the nation's acting top intelligence official.

Federal immigration officials raided several food-processing plants in Mississippi on Wednesday and arrested approximately 680 people believed to be working in the U.S. without authorization.

Some died trying to protect a loved one or newborn baby from a hail of bullets. Others were killed alongside their spouse as they made routine weekend purchases. Parents were slaughtered while doing back-to-school shopping.

Stories of self-sacrifice, heroism and devastating loss are emerging following the gun massacre on Saturday that killed at least 22 people who came from both sides of the border to a Walmart store in the predominantly Hispanic city of El Paso, Texas.

A judge in New York ordered federal agencies to produce thousands of pages of documents pertaining to the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, the Saudi journalist and U.S. resident who was slain in his country's consulate in Turkey last year.

U.S. District Judge Paul Engelmayer instructed the departments of State and Defense to produce some 5,000 pages monthly related to the killing of the Washington Post columnist. The judge said that the information about Khashoggi's disappearance and death is of "considerable public importance."

Cesar Sayoc, the Florida bodybuilder and nightclub bouncer who mailed inoperative pipe bombs to prominent Democrats and media figures seen as critical of President Trump, was sentenced to 20 years in prison by a federal judge in New York on Monday.

Major League Baseball's Philadelphia Phillies are suing the creators of "The Phillie Phanatic," to prevent them from making the green and furry mascot a "free agent," available to root for and promote other teams.

The Phanatic debuted at a Phillies game in April 1978 with the help of Harrison and Erickson, Inc., which designed and created it.

The Santa Clara County coroner's office says the gunman who fatally shot three people at a festival in Gilroy, Calif., last weekend killed himself, a conclusion that contradicts initial police reports that responding officers killed the shooter.

Nicole Lopez, a senior office specialist in the county's Medical Examiner-Coroner's Office, said that the gunman, Santino William Legan, 19, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

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